Fusion of Lateral Calvarial Sutures on Volume-Rendered Computed Tomography Reconstructions in Patients With Known Craniosynostosis : Journal of Craniofacial Surgery

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Fusion of Lateral Calvarial Sutures on Volume-Rendered Computed Tomography Reconstructions in Patients With Known Craniosynostosis

Wilkinson, C. Corbett MD*,†; Belanger, Katherine BS; Elbadry, Rasha MD§; Hoffman, Jessa MD; Ryan, Megan MS; Stence, Nicholas V. MD; Graber, Sarah J. BA*; Ridder, Thomas MD*; Batista, Ligia MA; French, Brooke M. MD#

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The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery 34(3):p 969-975, May 2023. | DOI: 10.1097/SCS.0000000000009278

Abstract

Introduction: 

After treating a child with familial sagittal craniosynostosis, clinocephaly, and bilateral parietomastoid/posterior squamosal suture fusion, the authors wondered if major-suture synostosis and clinocephaly were associated with abnormal fusion of minor lateral calvarial sutures.

Methods: 

The authors reviewed all preoperative volume-rendered head computed tomography reconstructions performed for craniosynostosis at their institution from 2010 through 2014 and determined whether the sphenoparietal, squamosal, and parietomastoid sutures were open, partially fused, or fused. The authors determined whether any sutures were abnormally fused based upon a previous study from their center, in which abnormal fusion was defined as either 1 of 3 abnormal fusion patterns or abnormally-early fusion. The authors then determined the rate of abnormal fusion of these sutures and whether abnormal fusion was associated with (1) major-suture craniosynostosis, (2) type of craniosynostosis (sutures involved; single-suture versus multisuture; syndromic versus nonsyndromic), and (3) clinocephaly.

Results: 

In 97 included children, minor lateral sutures were abnormally fused in 8, or 8.2%, which was significantly higher than in children without craniosynostosis from our earlier study. Abnormal minor lateral suture fusion was not associated with the type of single-suture synostosis or with multisuture synostosis but was associated with syndromic synostosis. Four of 8 children with abnormal minor lateral suture fusion had multisuture synostosis and 6 had syndromic synostosis. Lateral sutures were abnormally fused in 1 of 4 subjects with clinocephaly, which was not significant.

Conclusion: 

Abnormal minor lateral calvarial suture fusion is significantly associated with major-suture craniosynostosis, especially syndromic synostosis.

Copyright © 2023 by Mutaz B. Habal, MD

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