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Clinicopathologic Characteristics and Predictors Affecting Survival Outcome of Eyelid Malignancy

Aryasit, Orapan MD; Preechawai, Passorn MD; Hajeewaming, Nimastika MD

doi: 10.1097/SCS.0000000000005341
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The aim of this study was to determine the clinicopathologic characteristics and evaluate the prognostic factors in eyelid malignancies. This was a retrospective, comparative, case series of 70 patients with eyelid malignancies. The mean age at diagnosis was 72.0 years (range 30.5–93.0 years) with 64.3% female. The 2 most common histologic types were basal cell carcinoma (BCC) followed by sebaceous gland carcinoma (SGC). In total, 47.1% of the malignancies were located in the lower eyelid and the majority of tumor (T) category was T1. The authors assessed the disease-specific survival rates of 64 surgical patients using Kaplan Meier curves. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified the predictors associated with disease-specific survival. Of the 64 surgical patients, 4 had regional nodal metastasis (2 SGC, 1 squamous cell carcinoma [SCC], and 1 adenocarcinoma) and distant metastasis at diagnosis was in 3 patients (2 SGC and 1 malignant melanoma [MM]). Six patients died of disease during follow-up. The 5-year disease-specific survival in BCC, SCC, and SGC were 100%, 100%, and 64.8%, respectively. The predictive factors affecting worse disease-specific survival on multivariate models were T4 category (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 14.15, P = 0.022) and tumor recurrence (aHR 6.84, P = 0.045). In conclusion, BCC was the most common eyelid malignancy in southern Thailand followed by SGC. In this study, T4 category and tumor recurrence were the most important prognostic factors in eyelid malignancies.

Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Thailand.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Orapan Aryasit, MD, Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Hat Yai, Songkhla 90110, Thailand; E-mail: all_or_none22781@hotmail.com

Received 31 July, 2018

Accepted 19 December, 2018

Ethics approval was provided by the Ethics Committee, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University. (No.58-113-02-4).

OA and NH have received grants from Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University.

The authors report no conflicts of interest.

© 2019 by Mutaz B. Habal, MD.