Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

A New, Single-Stage, Distraction-Mediated, Cranial Vault Expansion Technique for the Multisuture Deformity

Mitchell, Brianne T. MD; Swanson, Jordan W. MD, MSc; Taylor, Jesse A. MD

doi: 10.1097/SCS.0000000000002105
Clinical Studies
Buy

Multisuture craniosynostosis with a mild cloverleaf deformity is rare but associated with high morbidity and mortality. Conventional treatment to alleviate intracranial hypertension in a young infant involves multisuturectomy and relies on passive correction of the deformity followed by additional staged reconstruction later in infancy. Early regional craniectomy and rigid reconstruction have been described, but the cranial bone has limited stability to tolerate plate fixation and extensive dissection of the bone–dura interface may devascularize the cranial bone flap and limit its durability. The authors report an interesting technique to treat a mild form of cloverleaf skull deformity using early, nondevascularizing osteotomies followed by application of semiburied cranial distractors in multiple planes to increase intracranial volume and treat the deformity, and its attendant volumetric constriction, in a single stage.

Division of Plastic Surgery, The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Jesse A. Taylor, MD, Division of Plastic Surgery, The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Colkett Translational Research Building, 3501 Civic Center Boulevard, 9th Floor, Philadelphia 19104, PA. E-mail: Taylorj5@email.chop.edu

Received 19 February, 2014

Accepted 21 July, 2015

This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.

Funded by the Department of Surgery and the Center for Human Appearance at the University of Pennsylvania.

The authors report no conflicts of interest.

© 2015 by Mutaz B. Habal, MD.