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Medical Device Networks Trouble Industry

Gee, Tim MA

Journal of Clinical Engineering: April-June 2009 - Volume 34 - Issue 2 - p 103-107
doi: 10.1097/JCE.0b013e3181a0bdcc
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As the adoption of wireless communications by medical devices and clinical applications in hospitals increases, the effort required to ensure safe and effective operation of wireless medical devices becomes more complex and important. Medical device systems have traditionally been designed and deployed as private networks. In the past few years, healthcare information technology adoption trends have forced medical device systems into the enterprise network. The transition of medical device systems into the hospital's enterprise network holds both promise and risk for medical device and network vendors, in addition to healthcare providers. Awareness and understanding of these issues assist providers in vendor selection, purchase requirements, and risk management.

As the adoption of wireless communications by medical devices and clinical applications in hospitals increases, the effort required to ensure safe and effective operation of wireless medical devices becomes more complex and important. Medical device systems have traditionally been designed and deployed as private networks. In the past few years, healthcare information technology adoption trends have forced medical device systems into the enterprise network. The transition of medical device systems into the hospital's enterprise network holds both promise and risk for medical device and network vendors, in addition to healthcare providers. Awareness and understanding of these issues assist providers in vendor selection, purchase requirements, and risk management.

From the Medical Connectivity Consulting, Beaverton, Oregon.

Corresponding author: Tim Gee, MA, Medical Connectivity Consulting, 7250 SW 154th Ter, Beaverton, OR 970007. tim@medicalconnectivity.com.

Tim Gee, MA, is a connectologist and principal at Medical Connectivity Consulting.

© 2009 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.