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Tiny Moments Matter

Promoting Professionalism in Everyday Practice

Bernabeo, Elizabeth C. MPH; Chesluk, Benjamin PhD; Lynn, Lorna MD

Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions: Spring 2018 - Volume 38 - Issue 2 - p 110–116
doi: 10.1097/CEH.0000000000000202
Original Research
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Introduction: Professionalism rests upon a number of individual, environmental, and societal level factors, leading to specific professional behavior in specific situations. Focusing on professional lapses to identify and remediate unprofessional physicians is incomplete. We explored professionalism in practicing internal medicine physicians in the context of everyday practice, to highlight how typical experiences contribute to positive, yet often unnoticed, professional behavior.

Methods: In-depth interviews were used to uncover 13 physicians' most meaningful experiences of professionalism. Data were collected and analyzed using a grounded theory approach.

Results: Results revealed several themes around which physicians embody professionalism in their daily lives. Physicians feel most professional when they are able to connect and establish trust with patients and colleagues and when they serve as positive role models to others. Physicians conceptualize professionalism as a dynamic and evolving competency, one that requires a lifelong commitment and that provides opportunities for lifelong learning.

Discussion: Focusing on actual perceptions of experiences in practice offers important insights into how physicians think about professionalism beyond a traditional remediation and lapses perspective. Physicians often go out of their way to connect with patients and colleagues, serving and modeling for others, often at the expense of their own work-life balance. These moments help to infuse energy and positivity into physician practices during a time when physicians may feel overburdened, overscheduled, and overregulated. Understanding professionalism as developmental helps frame professionalism as a lifelong competency subject to growth and modification over time.

American Board of Internal Medicine, Philadelphia, PA.

Correspondence: Elizabeth C. Bernabeo, MPH, American Board of Internal Medicine, 510 Walnut Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19106; e-mail: ebernabeo@abim.org.

Disclosures: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

© 2018 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
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