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Mazmanian Paul E. Ph.D.; van Harrison, R. Ph.D.; Osborne, Charles E.
Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions: Winter 1990
doi: 10.1002/chp.4750100105
Medicine: Medicines: PDF Only
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AbstractIt is understood that the delivery of medical school-based continuing medical education (CME) is organizationally diverse. One hundred and twenty (120) North American medical schools were surveyed in 1986 and 1988. Data on the number and types of programs offered, enrollments, and fees for fiscal years 1984–85 and 1986–87 were analyzed. The number and types of CME programs, enrollments, and fees increased over the two-year period, with smaller CME units experiencing the greatest growth. As shifts occur in the funding of health care and of medical education, medical school-based CME providers are challenged to maintain largely self-supporting units, protect the integrity of program content from the influence of health care marketing, and deliver more continuing education to the workplace and homes of physicians. As resource allocation and cost effectiveness assume increasing importance, more emphasis is likely to be placed on documenting the cost effectiveness of various types of programs and of the CME units that produce them.

It is understood that the delivery of medical school-based continuing medical education (CME) is organizationally diverse. One hundred and twenty (120) North American medical schools were surveyed in 1986 and 1988. Data on the number and types of programs offered, enrollments, and fees for fiscal years 1984–85 and 1986–87 were analyzed. The number and types of CME programs, enrollments, and fees increased over the two-year period, with smaller CME units experiencing the greatest growth. As shifts occur in the funding of health care and of medical education, medical school-based CME providers are challenged to maintain largely self-supporting units, protect the integrity of program content from the influence of health care marketing, and deliver more continuing education to the workplace and homes of physicians. As resource allocation and cost effectiveness assume increasing importance, more emphasis is likely to be placed on documenting the cost effectiveness of various types of programs and of the CME units that produce them.

© 1990 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

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