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Prototype Ultrahigh-Resolution Computed Tomography for Chest Imaging

Initial Human Experience

Shanbhag, Sujata M. MD, MPH*; Schuzer, John L. RT; Steveson, Chloe MHlthSc; Rollison, Shirley RT*; Bronson, Kathie C. CRNP*; Stagliano, Michael S. CRNP*; Rogalla, Patrik MD, PhD§; Blum, Alain MD, PhD; Prokop, Mathias MD, PhD; Chen, Marcus Y. MD*

Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography: September/October 2019 - Volume 43 - Issue 5 - p 805–810
doi: 10.1097/RCT.0000000000000917
Cardiothoracic Imaging
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Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate a prototype, ultrahigh-resolution computed tomography offering higher reconstruction matrix (1024 × 1024) and spatial resolution (0.15 mm) for chest imaging.

Methods Higher (1024) matrix reconstruction enabled by ultrahigh-resolution computed tomography scanner (128-detector rows; detector width, 0.25 mm; spatial resolution, 0.15 mm) was compared with conventional (512) reconstruction with image quality grading on a Likert scale (1, excellent; 5, nondiagnostic) for image noise, artifacts, contrast, small detail, lesion conspicuity, image sharpness, and diagnostic confidence. Image noise and signal-to-noise ratio were quantified.

Results Diagnostic image quality was achieved for all scans on 101 patients. The 1024 reconstruction demonstrated increased image noise (20.2 ± 4.0 vs 17.2 ± 3.8, P < 0.001) and a worse noise rating (1.98 ± 0.63 vs 1.75 ± 0.61, P < 0.001) but performed significantly better than conventional 512 matrix with fewer artifacts (1.37 ± 0.43 vs 1.50 ± 0.48, P < 0.001), better contrast (1.50 ± 0.56 vs 1.62 ± 0.57, P < 0.001), small detail detection (1.06 ± 0.19 vs 2.02 ± 0.22, P < 0.001), lesion conspicuity (1.08 ± 0.23 vs 2.02 ± 0.24, P < 0.001), sharpness (1.09 ± 0.24 vs 2.02 ± 0.28, P < 0.001), and overall diagnostic confidence (1.09 ± 0.25 vs 1.18 ± 0.34, P < 0.001).

Conclusions Ultrahigh-resolution computed tomography enabled a higher reconstruction matrix and improved image quality compared with conventional matrix reconstruction, with a minor increase in noise.

From the *Advanced Cardiovascular Imaging Laboratory, Division of Intramural Research, Department of Health and Human Services, Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Branch, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD

Canon Medical Research Institute USA, Inc, Vernon Hills, IL

Canon Medical Systems Corporation, Otawara, Japan

§University of Toronto, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Service d'Imagerie Guilloz, C.H.U. Hopital Central, Nancy, France

Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands.

Received for publication October 30, 2018; accepted April 29, 2019.

Correspondence to: Marcus Y. Chen, MD, Advanced Cardiovascular Imaging Laboratory, Division of Intramural Research, Department of Health and Human Services, Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Branch, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, 10 Center Dr, Bldg 10, Rm B1D-47, MSC 1046, Bethesda, MD 20892-1046 (e-mail: marcus.chen@nih.gov).

This study was funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Intramural Research Program (Clinical Trials Number, NCT02610465).

M.Y.C., P.R., A.B., and M.P. all have research agreements with Canon Medical Systems Corporation. J.L.S. and C.S. are employed by Canon Medical Research Institute and Canon Medical Systems Corporation and were not involved with the data analysis portion of this article.

Online date: September 6, 2019

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