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Dehiscence of the Jugular Bulb and Vestibular Aqueduct: Findings on 200 Consecutive Temporal Bone Computed Tomography Scans

Hourani, Roula MD*; Carey, John MD; Yousem, David M MD, MBA*

Journal of Computer Assisted Tomography: September-October 2005 - Volume 29 - Issue 5 - p 657-662
doi: 10.1097/01.rct.0000175499.34213.5d
Neuroimaging: Original Article
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Objective: To determine the incidence of dehiscence between the vestibular aqueduct and the jugular bulb on computed tomography (CT) scans and assess its implication as a cause of dizziness or hearing loss.

Methods: Two hundred temporal bone CT scans were evaluated for the prevalence of dehiscence between the jugular bulb and vestibular aqueduct. Correlation of the imaging findings and clinical data was performed.

Results: A total of 11.5% of patients had dehiscence of the jugular bulb with the vestibular aqueduct; 75% of these cases occurred on the right side and in the setting of a high jugular bulb. Nine (39.1%) of 23 patients with dehiscence had dizziness, and 11 (47.8%) had hearing loss. The correlation between the incidence of dizziness, hearing loss, and dehiscence was not significant.

Conclusion: The incidence of a dehiscent jugular bulb with a vestibular aqueduct is 11.5%. The prevalences of vertigo and hearing loss associated with this finding are 39.1% and 47.8%, respectively. The depiction of dehiscent jugular bulb-vestibular aqueduct should be considered with caution as the sole cause of symptoms.

From the *Neuroradiology Division, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, and †Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

Received for publication February 23, 2005; accepted June 14, 2005.

Presented as a scientific paper at the 2004 RSNA meeting.

Reprints: David M. Yousem, Neuroradiology Division, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, 600 North Wolfe Street, Phipps B-112, Baltimore, MD 21287 (e-mail: dyousem1@jhu.edu).

© 2005 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.