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Etiology, Evaluation, and Management of Dislocation After Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty

Saiz, Augustine M. MD1; Lum, Zachary C. DO1; Pereira, Gavin C. MBBS1

doi: 10.2106/JBJS.RVW.18.00165
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  • » The rate of dislocation after primary total hip arthroplasty has decreased, but given the high volume of total hip arthroplasty procedures that are performed, dislocation remains a common complication.
  • » The etiology of dislocation after total hip arthroplasty is multifactorial and depends on the patient’s characteristics as well as the orthopaedic surgeon’s operative techniques and decisions regarding implants.
  • » A detailed assessment of the patient, preoperative planning, a thorough understanding of the anatomy, proper surgical technique, and knowledge of the biomechanics of the implant decrease the likelihood of dislocations following total hip arthroplasty.
  • » The advent of new techniques and procedures has further reduced the occurrence of dislocation following total hip arthroplasty. However, should dislocation occur, primary management or revision total hip arthroplasty techniques provide excellent results to salvage the mobility and function of the hip.

1Hip & Knee Reconstruction Division, Department of Orthopaedics, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California

E-mail address for A.M. Saiz: amsaiz@ucdavis.edu

Investigation performed at the Hip & Knee Reconstruction Division, Department of Orthopaedics, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California

Disclosure: The authors indicated that no external funding was received for any aspect of this work. The Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest forms are provided with the online version of the article (http://links.lww.com/JBJSREV/A472).

Copyright © 2019 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated
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