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Tibial Shaft Fractures in Children and Adolescents

Raducha, Jeremy E., MD1; Swarup, Ishaan, MD2; Schachne, Jonathan M., BA2; Cruz, Aristides I. Jr., MD, MBA3; Fabricant, Peter D., MD, MPH2

doi: 10.2106/JBJS.RVW.18.00047
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Disclosures

  • * Tibial shaft fractures are common in the pediatric population.
  • * Traditionally, the majority of pediatric tibial fractures have been managed nonoperatively, but surgical rates are increasing.
  • * Management includes closed reduction and casting, flexible nailing, plate osteosynthesis, external fixation, and rigid intramedullary nailing.
  • * Gustilo-Anderson grade-2 and 3 open pediatric tibial shaft fractures have higher complication rates than closed fractures.
  • * The majority of pediatric tibial shaft fractures have excellent outcomes with an expectation for return to full activities.

1Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island

2Hospital for Special Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY

3Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hasbro Children’s Hospital, Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island

E-mail address for J.E. Raducha: Jeremy.raducha@gmail.com

Investigation performed at the Warren Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, and Hospital for Special Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY

Disclosure: There was no source of external funding for this study. The Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest forms are provided with the online version of the article (http://links.lww.com/JBJSREV/A418).

Copyright © 2019 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated
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