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Trapeziometacarpal Arthrosis

Wilkens, Suzanne C., MD1; Meghpara, Michael M., BSc1; Ring, David, MD, PhD2; Coert, J. Henk, MD, PhD3; Jupiter, Jesse B., MD, PhD1; Chen, Neal C., MD1

doi: 10.2106/JBJS.RVW.18.00020
Review Articles
Disclosures

  • * Trapeziometacarpal arthrosis is an expected part of normal human aging.
  • * The radiographic severity of trapeziometacarpal arthrosis may not correlate with symptom intensity or magnitude of limitations.
  • * Psychosocial factors may be important drivers of symptom intensity, magnitude of limitations, and seeking of treatment.
  • * Nonoperative treatment is palliative and not disease-modifying, but may facilitate long-term adaptation.
  • * Current surgical treatment strategies center around trapeziectomy, but it is unclear whether the addition of other stabilization or interposition techniques changes overall outcomes.

1Hand and Upper Extremity Service, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

2Department of Surgery and Perioperative Care, Dell Medical School at the University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas

3Department of Plastic Surgery and Hand Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands

E-mail address for N.C. Chen: Nchen1@partners.org

Investigation performed at the Hand and Upper Extremity Service, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts

Disclosure: There was no source of external funding for this study. The Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest forms are provided with the online version of the article (http://links.lww.com/JBJSREV/A411).

Copyright © 2019 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated
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