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Frequently Asked Reviewer Questions

How do I become a reviewer?
What is double-blind review?
How are reviewers selected for a paper?
How do I update my classifications or availability?
My review is going to be late. Can I have an extension?
How do I see the other reviewers' comments?
What do I do if I suspect that I know the authors?
What do I do if I suspect the paper I'm reviewing has been published previously?
Is CME credit available for reviews?
Are reviewers paid?
Why does the review process take so long?
What other resources are available for improving my reviews?

How do I become a reviewer?

  • Interested and experienced reviewer candidates can send an e-mail request for consideration along with a copy of his/her CV or resume to the Editorial Office. All requests are reviewed by the JBJS Editor-in-Chief and responded to on a case-by-case basis.

What is double-blind review?

  • JBJS articles undergo double-blinded peer review, where the authors' and reviewers' identities are not disclosed to each other. The journal staff carefully screens each paper to ensure that all references that may identify the author or the paper's origin are not revealed to the reviewer prior to editor assignment. This is done in order to minimize any bias and help preserve the integrity of the review process.

How are reviewers selected for a paper?

  • Reviewers are generally selected according to the classifications that they have entered in their profile in the submission system. These are then matched up with the manuscript's classifications that are assigned by the Editor after submission.

How do I update my classifications or availability?

  • To review the classifications on your profile as well as update any contact information, click on the Update My Information link on the top menu bar in Editorial Manager. You can also enter in any Unavailable Dates on this page.

My review is going to be late. Can I have an extension?

  • In most cases, a small extension of up to one week is acceptable. Please contact the Editorial Office to request this by replying to the reviewer invitation or reminder e-mail.

How do I see the other reviewers' comments?

  • After the review process has been completed for a paper, the comments of the other reviewers may be seen by selecting the "View Reviewer Comments" action link next to the paper in the Completed Assignments section of the Editorial Manager Reviewer Main Menu.

What do I do if I suspect that I know the authors?

  • Contact the Editorial Office by replying to the reviewer invitation or reminder e-mail in order to recuse yourself from the review.

What do I do if I suspect the paper I'm reviewing has been published previously?

  • Contact the Editorial Office by replying to the reviewer invitation/reminder e-mail or the handling Deputy Editor for the paper and provide as much detail as possible. We will investigate the claim in accordance with the Committee on Publication Ethics guidelines.

Is CME credit available for reviews?

  • Currently, CME credit is only available for Elite Reviewers. More information on this program can be found on the separate Elite Reviewers Program webpage.

Are reviewers paid?

  • Reviewers are not compensated for reviews. However, their names are included in an acknowledgment list that is published annually in print in the journal. High-performing reviewers are also sent certificates of appreciation on an annual basis.

Why does the review process take so long?

  • Delays in the review process may be due to a lack of qualified reviewers (i.e., via excessive declines), late reviews, or time spent in methodology review (which generally takes place after the content reviews have been completed). Turnaround time is carefully monitored by journal staff and reviewed on an annual basis.

What other resources are available for improving my reviews?