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A HISTOLOGICAL STUDY OF THE EARLY PHASES OF BONE REPAIR

HAM, ARTHUR W.

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The adult bone cell is distinguished from the osteogenic cell which is found lining the bone in the periosteum, the haversian canals, and the endosteum.

The adult bone cell was found to take no active part in the process of regeneration of bone following a fracture.

The osteogenic cells proliferate and differentiate into bone and cartilage.

Concerning the controversy regarding the existence of a specific osteogenic cell, the subject of metaplastic bone formation is reviewed. The usual method of bone repair is through the agency of these specific osteogenic cells and not by the metaplasia of fibroblasts.

Two factors, the presence of a local deposit of calcium salt and a good blood supply, are of great importance in effecting the differentiation of the osteogenic cell into bone.

Cartilage results from the growth of osteogenic cells in the absence of these two factors.

In the repair of fractures, bone and cartilage formation result from the differentiation of osteogenic cells in different environments.

The Department of Pathology, University of Toronto

Copyright © 1930 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated
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