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Spontaneous Radial Nerve Palsy due to an Unrecognized Myofibroma

A Case Report

Hinchcliff, Katharine M. MD1; Rogers, Jessica MD2; Sarohia, Dani MD3; Hornick, Jason MD, PhD4; Szabo, Robert M. MD, MPH5

doi: 10.2106/JBJS.CC.18.00284
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Disclosures

Case: A 33-year-old woman presented with a six-month history of spontaneous radial nerve palsy and no identified lesion on imaging. She underwent operative exploration where an hourglass deformity was seen and resected. Pathology returned as a rare tumor, a myofibroma. The patient regained full radial nerve function.

Conclusions: A trial of observation is often indicated in the cases of isolated nerve palsy where anatomic lesions have been eliminated. This case highlights that imaging studies can miss a tumor involving nerve and that painless, spontaneous nerve palsy may be a time where early surgical intervention offers a better chance of recovery.

1Division of Plastic Surgery, University of California—Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California

2Department of Pathology, University of California—Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California

3Department of Radiology, University of California—Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California

4Department of Surgical Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital—Boston, Massachusetts

5Department of Orthopedic Surgery, University of California—Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California

E-mail address for K.M. Hinchcliff: kmhinchcliff@ucdavis.edu

Investigation performed at University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California

Disclosure: The Disclosure of Potential Conflicts of Interest forms are provided with the online version of the article (http://links.lww.com/JBJSCC/A809).

Copyright © 2019 by The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, Incorporated
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