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Information for Authors

​​​Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care accepts manuscript submissions through a submission service on another website.

JANAC INFORMATION FOR AUTHORS

Mission of the Journal

The Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (JANAC) is the official journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care (ANAC).

JANAC’s mission is to support nursing practice, research, education, and advocacy through the dissemination of scholarly, cutting-edge, evidence-based, and evolving knowledge and practice standards related to HIV, and its co-morbidities. JANAC provides a forum for interprofessional discussions of timely and thought-provoking professional and societal issues associated with clinical practice, education, research, prevention, public health, health administration, global health, legal-ethical issues, health equity, environmental issues, and public policy related to all aspects of HIV and its comorbidities. 

JANAC invites original articles that focus on a broad spectrum of issues related to HIV, from the perspectives of nursing, public health, behavioral health, and medicine. Submissions are welcomed from nurses and other health care professionals. We support submissions from multiprofessional teams.

JANAC publishes original articles, focused on HIV and related conditions, that:

  • Create a global forum for authors to share results, methods, innovations, and expert opinions.
  • Contribute to improved standards of care.
  • Critically review and advance the state of the science.
  • Provide an interactive forum for translating evidence-based, clinically relevant, and peer-reviewed research into practice.
  • Represent a broad range of clinical care, research, education, and advocacy issues.
  • Reflect the multiprofessional nature of care associated with HIV prevention, care, and treatment, including related physical, social, spiritual, and mental health conditions.
  • Emphasize the vital roles of nurses in transforming global health, including clinical care, policy development, education, research, and advocacy of nurses and other health care providers.

Readers of JANAC include nurses and other health care and social service providers from around the world with an interest in all topics associated with HIV and its related conditions.

JANAC’s core values of inquiry, innovation, involvement, integrity, and inclusion were explained in this editorial

JANAC is committed to equity, diversity, and inclusion. As such, the journal fosters diversity in its many forms and with its many communities of interest, including, but not limited to, authors, editors and editorial leadership team, editorial board composition, peer reviewers, readers, our publisher, and the members of our parent organization, ANAC. We strive to cherish and embrace diversity, and create inclusive and equitable environments and processes so that all individuals have an opportunity to flourish.  


TABLE OF CONTENTS


ETHICAL/LEGAL CONSIDERATIONS

JANAC is a peer-reviewed journal that follows publishing standards set by the American Psychological Association (APA) and the Committee on Publication Ethics (COPE). Although the editors and referees make every effort to ensure the validity of published manuscripts, the final responsibility rests with the authors, not with the Journal, its editors, or the publisher.

A submitted manuscript must be an original contribution not previously published in print or online (except as an abstract, preliminary report, thesis, dissertation, or preprint).

If an abstract from a poster or presentation has been published in conference proceedings, the abstract and manuscript submitted to JANAC must be substantially different and provide new information for readers.

A preprint may have been posted anytime and anywhere, including on scholarly collaboration networks (scns). During the submission process, authors will be asked to upload a document explaining how they revised the manuscript based on the comments they received on the preprint. If the submitted manuscript is accepted, to ensure that readers can find and cite the final published version, we encourage researchers to add the digital object identifier (doi) to the posted preprint version.

The submitted paper must not be under consideration for publication elsewhere, and, if accepted, must not be published elsewhere in a similar form, in any language, without the consent of Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Accusations of Misconduct & Ethical Breaches

JANAC will follow the COPE guidelines and flowcharts regarding accusations of misconduct and ethical breaches (http://publicationethics.org). The publisher’s input may also be sought.

Whistleblowers

When an accusation is made by a reader (“whistleblower”), the editorial office will respond acknowledging receipt of the message, let the person know that the accusation will be investigated, and the editorial office will let the person know the result of the investigation once it is completed.

Acknowledgements

Authors should acknowledge all sources of funding in an Acknowledgment Statement on the title page of the manuscript and include the grant number and PI’s name. If no funding was received, the authors should state this. The acknowledgment section is also an appropriate place to acknowledge assistance from non-author colleagues in the development and production of a manuscript.

Appeals

Appeals regarding manuscript decisions may be submitted at any time. Authors will receive a decision within 6 weeks. Please see Appeals in the Procedures section.

Authorship

Each person listed as an author is expected to have participated in the work to a significant extent according to the International Committee for Medical Journal Editors’ (ICMJE) authorship criteria. Authorship credit should be based on (a) substantial contributions to conception and design, acquisition of data, or analysis and interpretation of data; (b) drafting the manuscript or revising it critically for important intellectual content; (c) final approval of the version to be published; and (d) agreement to be accountable for all aspects of the work in ensuring that questions related to the accuracy or integrity of any part of the work are appropriately investigated and resolved. Authors must meet all 4 conditions. (Retrieved from http://www.icmje.org/recommendations/browse/roles-and-responsibilities/defining-the-role-of-authors-and-contributors.html)

Authors must include the contributions of each author in the Acknowledgment section, using the CRediT taxonomy (available at https://casrai.org/credit/). See the example title page in the JANAC style guide.

By signing the Authorship Responsibility, Disclosure, and Copyright Transfer agreement, each author warrants that s/he has participated sufficiently in the intellectual content; the analysis of data, if applicable; and writing of the paper to take public responsibility for it. Each has reviewed the final version of the paper, believes it represents valid work, and approves it for publication. All persons designated as authors should qualify for authorship, and all those who qualify should be listed as authors (according to the ICMJE, see above). Should the editor request the data upon which the work is based, the authors shall produce it.

Justification of assignment of authorship, including details of the role each of the listed authors had in the work, must be provided at the time of submission in the submission letter to the editor. Individuals who have not contributed sufficiently to the manuscript or do not meet the ICMJE criteria should not be included in the author list. These individuals should be named, with a statement of what they contributed to the work, in the Acknowledgments Statement on the Title Page.

Example Authorship Contribution Statement:

All authors on this paper meet the four criteria for authorship as identified by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE); all authors have contributed to the conception and design of the study, drafted or have been involved in revising this manuscript, reviewed the final version of this manuscript before submission, and agree to be accountable for all aspects of the work.  Specifically, using the CRediT taxonomy, the specific contributions of each author is as follows:  Conceptualization & Methodology: C. Kudzai, K. Overstreet, L. Bradley-Springer; Formal Analysis: C. Kudzai, L. Bradley-SpringerFunding acquisition: K. Overstreet; Investigation: C. Kudzai, K. Overstreet; Project administration: K. Overstreet; Supervision: K. Overstreet; Validation: L. Bradley-Springer; Writing – original draft: C. Kudzai, L. Bradley-Springer; Writing/Revising – K. Overstreet.

Change to Authorship

Authorship and the order of authors are established in the initial manuscript submission. Any Changes to Authorship after that must be formally requested in a letter listing (a) newly added or deleted authors and/or a change in the order of the previously listed authors, and (b) the reason for the change. All of the manuscript’s originally listed authors (including any who are being removed from the list), as well as any newly added authors, must signify agreement to the change. The corresponding author should email this information to all of the authors and copy the editorial office [email protected]. Each author should then reply to all with his/her approval.

Death of a Co-author

  • Before submission of the manuscript – if the co-author has contributed fully to the manuscript, according to ICMJE guidelines (see above), then they may be listed as a co-author. If not, they can be credited in the acknowledgment section. If they are listed as a co-author, their legal representative (e.g., next of kin) will need to sign the requested disclosure and copyright forms. If the legal representative cannot be found/contacted, the head of the author’s institution may be able to complete and sign the documents on the author’s behalf.
  • After submission of the manuscript – if they are listed as a co-author, their legal representative (e.g., next of kin) will need to sign the requested disclosure and copyright forms, unless these had been signed by the author prior to their death. If the legal representative cannot be found/contacted, the head of the author’s institution may be able to complete and sign the documents on the author’s behalf.
  • Change in authorship – when a change in authorship occurs after the manuscript has been submitted, all authors have to sign an approval statement indicating they agree with the change. The deceased author’s legal representative will need to sign on their behalf.
  • After publication – after publication of the article, any changes to authorship will require a correction to the published record, and the deceased author’s legal representative will need to sign on their behalf.

Bias-Free Language

See Requirements section below.

Citations and References

Predatory Journals

JANAC will not allow citations to content that is published in journals that are considered to be predatory. The editors will use the INANE nursing journals directory (available at https://nursingeditors.com/journals-directory/) and the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ; available at https://doaj.org), as well as PubMed, Medline, and other resources to determine the legitimacy of the journals included in a manuscript’s reference list. If an author is suspected of citing predatory content in their manuscript, the editor will ask the author to remove that citation and content from the submission before an editorial decision of “accept” will be made.

Retracted Content

JANAC will not allow citations to content that has been formally retracted. Content that includes an Expression of Concern will be carefully evaluated.

Content Published in Other Languages

Citations to content published in other languages must include the English translation in the reference list and a working URL to an accessible version of the content or a PDF of the content submitted with the manuscript files.

Clinical Trials

JANAC requires that clinical trials submitted for review and possible publication are registered in clinicaltrials.gov (or equivalent) prior to submission of the paper. As of June 1, 2020, JANAC requires that any submissions coming from clinical trials are registered before enrollment of the first participant. The PROSPERO registration number will be required for all systematic review manuscripts after 1 January 2021. The registration number should be included in a note on the title page.

To ensure a double-blind peer review process, which is another mechanism of ensuring the integrity of JANAC, all approval and registration numbers will not be included in the manuscripts until after acceptance; at that time, the corresponding authors will be asked to insert the acceptance/registration numbers during the copy-editing process.

The National Institutes of Health define a clinical trial as, “a research study in which one or more human participants are prospectively assigned to one or more interventions (which may include placebo or other control) to evaluate the effects of those interventions on health-related biomedical or behavioral outcomes.” (https://grants.nih.gov/policy/clinical-trials/CT-Definition-Case-Studies_1.17.18.pdf). Cohort, retrospective, and observational studies without an intervention do not require registration. Studies of human subjects with prospective assignment of an intervention by the investigators, however, must be registered, regardless of the size of the trial (http://www.who.int/ictrp/en).

Confidentiality

Authors: Authors are expected to keep the review comments they receive confidential. If they would like to submit the review comments with their manuscript to another journal, they must seek permission from JANAC’s Editor-in-Chief.

Reviewers: Reviewers are expected to keep all of the information they receive about manuscripts they are reviewing confidential. If they would like to mentor a student or junior faculty member in peer review, using the manuscript, they must request permission from the Editor-in-Chief. Peer review materials are confidential in perpetuity.

Editors / Editorial Board: Editors and Editorial Board members are expected to keep all information about submitted manuscripts and reviews confidential in perpetuity, as well as any other information that is marked confidential (e.g., publisher’s reports).

Conflicts of Interest

Authors: Authors are required to provide full disclosure of actual or potential conflicts of interest relevant to the subject matter of the manuscript that have occurred over the previous 2 years, during the period of time that the submitted work was conducted, and/or that can reasonably be expected to occur in the foreseeable future. Disclosures may include, but are not limited to, grants and funding, employment, affiliations, honoraria, consultancies, board positions, royalties, stock options and ownership, or expert testimony. Unless determined to be important to the review process, disclosures are held confidential until a manuscript is accepted for publication. Disclosure statements appear with all articles published in JANAC. Authors should contact the Managing Editor with questions or concerns but should err on the side of inclusion when in doubt.

The potential for a conflict of interest or competing interest could occur when an author, group of authors, and/or any of the authors’ institutions:

  • receive commercial funding to conduct research and write a report,
  • write an article and then submit it under another individual’s name (often an expert in the field, called ghostwriting),
  • has a relationship with a third-party agency that has something to gain or lose through publication of the paper and feels obliged to publish for this entity. For example, an author:
    • receives research equipment from an agency (other than the one with which the author is employed),
    • sits on the board of the agency,
    • is employed by or owns stock or shares in the company,
    • is seeking employment at the agency,
    • provides consultation to the agency, or
    • receives travel funding, speaking fees, or other honoraria from the agency
  • holds a patent on a product that may be affected by publication of the paper, and
  • is being paid by one side in a court case to provide expert testimony on a topic relevant to the topic of the submitted manuscript.

These are just a few examples. Disclosure should be completed when an author has a relationship with another party and it could be construed that either: (a) the other party has something to gain or lose through publication of the paper, or (b) the author or group of authors has something to gain or lose through publication of the paper.

Conditions of Disclosure. Disclosure of a potential conflict of interest gives the journal editors information to determine whether a conflict of interest actually exists, and, if so, the degree to which it may have affected the work.  The editors will also determine whether it is appropriate to inform reviewers of a submitted manuscript or readers of a published manuscript about a potential or existing conflict of interest. Transparency protects all parties from potential suspicion and perceived deception. Disclosure of a potential conflict of interest, even if found to be a real conflict, does not necessarily mean that the research has been affected or that the manuscript cannot be reviewed or published in the journal. The purpose is to document potential problems and provide an avenue for resolution of those problems prior to publication.

  • It is the responsibility of the submitting author to report potential conflicts of interest for all of the authors during manuscript submission, but all authors are equally responsible for omissions or purposeful deceptions.
  • All sources of funding and in-kind donations (including funding from government agencies such as the National Institutes of Health) must be disclosed in an acknowledgment on the title page.
  • Disclosure of conflict of interest information should be updated as needed during the review and revision process.

Example text: This study was funded in part by ABC Corporation and grant #1-234-5678 from DEF Foundation awarded to Jane Smith (PI). Jane Smith reports having received lecture fees from XYZ Laboratories. Susan Brown disclosed consulting fees from 123 Inc. Elizabeth Wall reports no financial interests or potential conflicts of interest.

Editorial Responsibilities. If the editors, based on the information provided by the submitting author, determine that a significant conflict of interest exists:

  • All authors of the manuscript may be asked for written explanations of the identified conflict(s) of interest.
  • Authors will be notified if the editors feel it is necessary to inform the reviewers of a submitted manuscript or readers of a published manuscript of the conflict(s) of interest.
  • If the editors, through any means, discover a conflict of interest that was not disclosed by the authors:
    • The editors have the right to take any action deemed necessary, based on the severity of the omission, to protect the journal from negative consequences.
    • The editors have the right to take any action deemed necessary, based on the severity of the omission, to protect readers from misinformation.
    • Actions may include removing a submitted manuscript from the review process, rejecting a submitted manuscript, retracting a published manuscript, publishing a correction to a published manuscript, notifying the authors’ institutions of misconduct, banning the authors from submitting any future manuscripts to JANAC, or any combination of the above.

Editors

As of 2020, the entire editorial board of the journal completes annual disclosure forms. Starting in 2021, the disclosed information will be published on the JANAC website at www.janacnet.org.

Reviewers

The Instruction email that is sent to the Reviewers through Editorial Manager, following acceptance of the invitation to review, includes the following:

Conflict of interest. Please contact the Editor immediately if: you believe that you know the author(s) of the manuscript; you believe the content of the manuscript may cause a potential scholarly, financial, commercial, and/or personal conflict of interest for you; you detect plagiarism, dual submission, or previous publication of the content; or you detect scientific fraud.

Reviewers are also asked on the Review Form for each manuscript to declare and describe any conflicts of interest they may have regarding the manuscript, study, or authors.

Resources:

Hames, I. (2007). Peer review and manuscript management in scientific journals: Guidelines for good practice. Malden, MA: Blackwell.

Council of Science Editors. (2006). Guidance for journals developing or revising policies on conflict of interest, disclosure, or competing financial interests. Retrieved March 21, 2008, from http://www.councilscienceeditors.org/events/retreat_paper_2005-02.pdf

Davidoff, F., DeAngelis, C.D., Drazen, J.M., The Editors, Hoey, J., Højgaard, L., et al. (n.d.). International Committee of Medical Journal Editors – Publication Ethics: Sponsorship, Authorship, and Accountability. Retrieved March 21, 2008, from http://www.icmje.org/sponsor.htm

Goozner, M., Caplan, A., Moreno, J., Kramer, B.S., Babor, T.F., & Husser, W.C. (2008). A common standard for conflict of interest disclosure. Retrieved July 30, 2008, from http://cspinet.org/new/pdf/20080711_a_common_standard_for_conflict_of_interest_disclosure__final_for_conference.pdf

Copyright

Manuscripts accepted for publication become the property of JANAC and may not be published elsewhere without permission from the editor. Authors will be asked to sign a transfer of copyright agreement acknowledging the manuscript transfer. The author is responsible for the content of the original and final manuscript, accuracy of references, quoted material, and for any violation of copyright.

Upon submission of the first revision, each author must complete and submit the journal's copyright transfer agreement, which includes a section on the disclosure of potential conflicts of interest based on the ICMJE recommendations, "Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals" (www.icmje.org/update.html). Each author will receive an email to the online disclosure and copyright form when the revised manuscript is submitted by the corresponding author. The corresponding author will complete this form during the initial submission process.

A copy of the form is made available to the corresponding author within the Editorial Manager submission platform. Upon submission of the revised manuscript, co-authors will automatically receive an email with instructions for completing the form.

Compliance with NIH/other research funding agency accessibility requirements. Many funding agencies require or request authors to submit the post-print (the article after peer review and acceptance but not the final published article) to a repository that is publicly accessible online without charge. As a service to our authors, LWW will identify National Library of Medicine (NLM) articles that require deposit and will transmit the post-print of an article to PubMed Central based on research funded in whole or in part by the National Institutes of Health, Wellcome Trust, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, or other funding agencies. The Copyright Transfer Agreement document provides the mechanism for this process.

Open Access

Authors of accepted peer-reviewed manuscripts have the option of paying a fee to allow perpetual unrestricted online access to the published article to readers globally. To ensure that this option has no influence on the peer review and acceptance process, authors may select the open access option at the point of acceptance. All submitted manuscripts are subject to the journal's standard peer-review process and will be accepted or rejected based on their own merit.

If an author selects the Open Access option during the submission of the manuscript, an article processing charge (APC) is requested upon acceptance of the manuscript and should be paid within 30 days by the author, funding agency, or institution. Payment must be processed for the article to be published open access. For a list of journals and pricing, please visit the Wolters Kluwer Open Health Journals page.

Authors Retain Copyright: Authors retain the copyright for all articles they opt to publish as open access. Authors grant LWW an exclusive license to publish the article and the article is made available under the terms of a Creative Commons user license. Please visit the Open Access Publication Process page for more information.

Creative Commons License: Open access articles are freely available to read, download, and share from the time of publication under the terms of the Creative Commons License Attribution-NonCommerical No Derivative (CC BY-NC-ND) license. This license does not permit reuse for any commercial purpose, nor does it permit the reuse or modification of individual elements of the work (i.e., figures, tables) in the creation of derivative works without specific permission.

Compliance with Funder Mandated Open Access Policies: An author whose work is funded by an organization that mandates the use of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license may meet that requirement through the available open access license for approved funders. Information about the approved funders can be found at http://www.wkopenhealth.com/inst-fund.php

FAQ for Open Accesshttp://www.wkopenhealth.com/openaccessfaq.php

Corrections/Expressions of Concern & Retractions

Corrections and Expressions of Concern will be published as needed to correct published content or to express concern about content that is under investigation for some reason. Retractions will be issued, as needed, following full investigation of an identified issue regarding published content. JANAC will follow the COPE guidelines (http://publicationethics.org) in regard to these policies and procedures, as well as the publisher’s policies and procedures regarding corrections/ expressions of concern and retractions.

Data Sharing and Transparency

“Authors are expected to retain the data associated with a published article in accordance with institutional requirements; funder requirements; participant agreements; and, when publishing in an APA journal . . .” (APA, 2020, p.13). This allows for open science and other researchers to confirm the reported analyses. Authors can place their anonymized data (participant identity must be protected) in repositories for archival, providing a link and DOI to those data or manage requests personally, as received. “Data-sharing arrangements must be entered into with proper consideration of the rights of the copyright owner, participants’ consent, requirements of funding agencies, requirements of IRBs and other ethics committees that provided permission to conduct the study, and rules promulgated by the employer of the holder of the data” (APA, 2020, p. 15). Authors bear any costs associated with data sharing.

Data Accessibility Statement. JANAC encourages authors to include a data accessibility statement on their title pages, indicating whether the underlying data, materials, and code for a study are available from the corresponding author or a data repository, etc. These statements will be required for all articles published after December 2021.  Examples of statements follow:

  • Data may be provided via a request to the corresponding author.  
  • Data may be available upon request to the corresponding author, depending upon
    privacy/ethical/embargo restrictions. 
  • Data has been provided in the online supplemental material.  
  • Data is available through an online repository with this DOI: XXXXXX.  
  • No new data was used; therefore, data sharing is not applicable.

Duplicate Submission and Publication

“Misrepresentation of data as original when they have been published previously is specifically prohibited by the APA Ethics Code. Duplicate publication distorts the knowledge base by making it appear that more information is available than actually exists. It also wastes scarce resources (journal pages and the time and efforts of editors and reviewers). The prohibition against duplicate publication is especially critical for the cumulative knowledge of the field. Duplicate publication can give the erroneous impression that findings are more replicable than is the case or that particular conclusions are more strongly supported than is warranted by the cumulative evidence.” (APA 7th edition, 2020, pp. 17-18)

Embargoes

JANAC typically does not embargo content, other than articles scheduled for press releases. Editorials are not published online ahead of print if they relate to the content in the issue.

Ghost & Gift Authorship

JANAC does not allow ghost or gift authorship on any content published in the journal. Ghost authorship is when someone writes the content but is not listed as an author. This sometimes occurs when a professional writer is hired to help the authors with the writing of the content. Gift authorship is when someone who does not satisfy the ICMJE criteria for authorship (see Authorship, above) is listed as an author.

Human Subjects & IRB Approval

Research Participant Anonymity and Informed Consent

It is the responsibility of the author(s) to ensure protection of research participant anonymity and to verify that human subjects investigations were conducted with informed consent, followed all guidelines for human subjects investigations required by the institution(s) with which the authors are affiliated, and, at minimum, in accordance with The Code of Ethics of the World Medical Association (Declaration of Helsinki) for investigations involving human subjects. A statement indicating that the study received IRB approval should be included in the Methods section. During the copyediting process for accepted manuscripts, the authors will be asked to add the IRB approval number to the text.

IRB Approval

Research studies involving human subjects must be submitted to the authors’ institutions (e.g., universities) for approval, prior to collecting data. They must also be approved by any institution where data will be collected (e.g., hospital, clinic). It is the responsibility of the author(s) to ensure protection of research participant anonymity and to verify that human subjects investigations were conducted with informed consent, followed all guidelines for human subjects investigations required by the institution(s) with which the authors are affiliated, and, at minimum, in accordance with The Code of Ethics of the World Medical Association (Declaration of Helsinki) for investigations involving human subjects. A statement indicating that the study received IRB approval should be included in the Methods section. During the copyediting process for accepted manuscripts, the authors will be asked to add the IRB approval number to the text.

Image Integrity

If images are altered in any way, the alterations must be described in the Figure note. Please see the Council of Science Editor guidelines on image integrity. 

Multiple Publications From one Study

It is not uncommon to produce more than one paper from one data set/study. In these circumstances, each paper must represent a clearly unique use of the data and be presented in a manner that avoids any perception of self-plagiarism. JANAC requires that authors who submit a paper using data from a previously-published work discuss the following in the body of the manuscript: (a) information about the previously-published work, including a citation and reference to the original article, as well as citations and references to other articles published from the original data, as pertinent to the submitted manuscript; (b) how the data used in the submission were analyzed and how (or if) the current analysis differs from analysis in the original article; (c) a description of the participants in the submission and how (or if) the participants differ from those in the original article; and (d) a clear and specific statement about how the submitted work differs from other publications from the study and why the further use of these data is appropriate. Readers should not be referred to another publication for information about the methods, data collection, procedures, instruments, etc. The authors need to provide sufficient information in the submitted manuscript so that the overall methods are sufficiently clear.

Additionally, if the content has been presented at a conference in oral or poster form, and/or if the abstract has been published in conference proceedings, a statement to this effect must be included in the Acknowledgment section.

Permissions

When using other authors’ works, (e.g., quoted text, modifying or adapting a published table or figure, or re-publishing a tool or questionnaire), even if the source material is not copied exactly, authors must cite the original source and submit written permission from the copyright owner (usually the publisher). (Often the required citation is prescribed by the copyright holder.) Merely referencing the original source may not be enough. It is the sole responsibility of the author(s) to obtain required permissions and to pay all permissions fees that are required by the copyright owner. See https://shop.lww.com/journal-permission for permission issues, such as requesting permission to post or re-publish content published in JANAC.

Plagiarism Prevention

JANAC uses iThenticate© to detect similarities between submitted papers and previously published materials, including information published on the Internet. We will not review submissions with excessive similarities to other publications, including those authored by the individuals submitting the manuscript to JANAC (self-plagiarism).

Predatory Journals and Citations

JANAC will not allow citations to content that is published in journals that are considered to be predatory. The editors will use the INANE nursing journals directory (available at https://nursingeditors.com/journals-directory/) and the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ); as well as PubMed, Medline, and other resources to determine the legitimacy of the journals included in a manuscript’s reference list. If a citation or reference is suspected of being predatory content, the editor will ask the author to remove that citation and content from the submission before an editorial decision of “accept” will be made. Additionally, if an author includes citations to references in a language other than English or sources that cannot be accessed online, the author will need to provide those references to the JANAC editorial office in English so they can be verified or cite a different source.

JANAC also will not allow citations to content that has been formally retracted. Content that includes an Expression of Concern will be carefully evaluated.

Systematic Reviews
and Other Types of Reviews

​JANAC requires that all systematic reviews submitted for review, and possibly publication, are registered with PROSPERO (or equivalent registry) prior to beginning data extraction. The PROSPERO registration number will be required for all systematic review manuscripts after 1 January 2021. The registration number should be included in a note on the title page.  The PRISMA 2020 Statement: An Updated Guideline for Reporting Systematic Reviews should be followed in conducting a systematic review (please refer to BMJ 2021; 372 doi:https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.n71). 

If a systematic review was not registered with PROSPERO prior to data extraction, the author(s) are asked to include a systematic review protocol equivalent to the elements associated with PROSPERO registration as Supplemental Digital Content.

JANAC does accept other types of reviews including scoping and integrative reviews.  Since these reviews cannot be registered with PROSPERO, or an equivalent registry, authors are required to submit the review protocol as supplemental digital content.

Preprints

JANAC will allow submissions of manuscripts that are simultaneously posted on a preprint server. Manuscript submissions that are/have been posted as preprints must include a supplementary file that details the responses to the comments received on the posted preprint.

JANAC allows citations to content on preprint servers on a case-by-case basis. If the content has also been published in a journal, the citation should be to the published content. When citing a preprint, add “[Preprint]” after the repository/server name in the reference list and add “PREPRINT” after the citation in text, within the parentheses.

For example (Wong, 2021, PREPRINT).

Reporting guidelines

See Requirements section below.

Requirements

Bias-Free Language

Do not use language that might imply prejudice, perpetuate stereotypes, or discriminate against people based on “age, disability, gender, participation in research, racial or ethnic identity, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, marital status, immigration status, religion” or some combination of these (APA, 2020, p. 131). It is important not to describe a person as their disease (e.g., HIV+ person, drug user) but instead to say a person with a disease (e.g., person living with HIV (PLWH), person who uses drugs). APA style now endorses the use of “they,” “them,” “their,” and “theirs” as generic third-person singular pronouns. Authors should not use “he,” “she,” “her,” or “him” unless they are certain that the person being referred to uses those pronouns. When reporting specifics about study participants, use the labels the participants use for themselves, but do not use “slurs or stigmatizing language” (APA, 2020, p. 133). Be careful of comparing groups of people so as not to marginalize one group and normalize another. 

From APA, 2020, p. 138:

"Reporting of Gender. Authors are strongly encouraged to explicitly designate information about the gender identities of the participants making up their samples (e.g., whether participants are transgender, cisgender, or other gender identities) rather than assuming cisgender identities. Cisgender refers to individuals whose sex assigned at birth aligns with their gender identity (APA, 2015a). Cisgenderism or cissexism refers to the belief that being cisgender is normative, as indicated by the assumption that individuals are cisgender unless otherwise specified (both terms are in use). Genderism refers to the belief that there are only two genders and that gender is automatically linked to an individual’s sex assigned at birth (American Psychological Association of Graduate Students, 2015)."

In 2021, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released “Resources & Style Guides for Framing Health Equity & Avoiding Stigmatizing Language.” Authors are encouraged to review this resource to ensure the use of inclusive and equitable language.​

Racial and Ethnic Terms

Correct Usage

Notes

Black, White

Capitalize. Do not use colors to refer to other groups of people. If using Black, use White, not European etc., and vice-versa. Do not use “the Black race” or “the White race”.

African American, Asian American, Native American etc.

Capitalize. Do not use hyphens.

African, African American, Black

Black and African American are acceptable for people in the United States. Do not use African American to refer to people of African ancestry worldwide. Use specific terms such as Nigerian, Kenyan, Jamaican, etc.

Asian, Asian American, Asian Canadian, etc.

Asian and Asian American are not synonymous. Asian = people of Asian ancestry from Asia. Asian American = people of Asian ancestry from the United States, etc.

European, European American, White

Based on location, use the term that is appropriate for the ancestry of the person.

Aboriginal, Indigenous Peoples, Maori, Native American

Capitalize. Do not hyphenate.

Native American, Hawaiian Native, Indigenous Peoples of the Hawaiian Islands, Pacific Islander

All correct for Hawaiian Natives.

Indigenous Peoples Around the World – specify the nation or people whenever possible

Collectively:

Canada – Indigenous Peoples or Aboriginal Peoples

Latin America & Caribbean – Indigenous Peoples

Australia – Aboriginal People or Aboriginal Australians; Torres Strait Islander People or Torres Strait Island Australians

New Zealand – Maori or Maori people

People of Middle Eastern and North African origin

Use the state or nation of origin (e.g., Iraq, Egypt).

People of Hispanic or Latino/a/x Ethnicity

Ask the person/population you are referring to for the correct designation. Latino might be accepted for those from Latin America. Hispanic may be accepted for those who speak Spanish. [email protected] and Latinx are accepted as gender-neutral terms; however, some populations do not associate with these terms.

people of color, underrepresented groups

Use these terms for non-White racial and ethnic groups collectively, not “minorities”. Do not use “underprivileged”.


Note. From APA 7th edition, 2020, chapter on bias-free language.

Sexual Orientation

Correct Usage

Notes

sexual orientation

Do not use “sexual preference,” “sexual identity,” “sexual orientation identity”. Examples of sexual orientation are: asexual, bisexual, gay, heterosexual, lesbian, pansexual, polysexual, queer, straight. Do not use homosexual.

sexual and gender diverse populations

Correct term for multiple sexual and/or gender minority groups.

LGBTQ etc.

If using an acronym, define the components and be consistent throughout the manuscript. Ensure the definition of the acronym is representative of the population to which you are referring.


Note. From APA 7th edition, 2020, chapter on bias-free language. 

Socioeconomic Status

Correct Usage

Notes

Mothers who receive TANF, people experiencing homelessness, people in transitional housing

Do not use “homeless,” “poverty stricken,” “welfare reliant”.

People who have a grade school education

Do not use “high-school dropout,” “poorly educated,” or “having little education”.


Note. From APA 7th edition, 2020, chapter on bias-free language. 

Reporting Guidelines

JANAC requires that authors use the following industry-recognized reporting guidelines to assure that minimum reporting requirements are met. The checklist for each guideline must be uploaded with your manuscript files as a supplementary file. For further information on reporting guidelines, visit www.equator-network.org

Study Type

Reporting Guideline

Link to Guideline

Clinical Practice Guidelines

AGREE

Checklist: https://www.equator-network.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/AGREE-Reporting-Checklist.pdf

Case Reports

CARE

Checklist: https://static1.squarespace.com/static/5db7b349364ff063a6c58ab8/t/5db7bf175f869e5812fd4293/1572323098501/CARE-checklist-English-2013.pdf

Statement: https://www.care-statement.org

Randomized Controlled Trial (RTC)

CONSORT

Checklist: http://www.consort-statement.org/consort-statement/overview0/

Flowchart - http://www.consort-statement.org/consort-statement/overview0/

Qualitative Research Interviews and Focus Groups

COREQ

Checklist: https://academic.oup.com/intqhc/article/19/6/349/1791966#27217737

Systematic Reviews or Meta-analyses of RTCs

PRISMA

Checklist: https://www.equator-network.org/reporting-guidelines/prisma/

Flowchart - https://www.equator-network.org/reporting-guidelines/prisma/

Systematic approach to reporting about sex and gender in research

SAGER

Guideline: http://www.ease.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Sager.for-web.pdf

Checklist: Appendix 2 of article at https://researchintegrityjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s41073-016-0007-6

Standard Protocol Items for Clinical Trials

SPIRIT

Checklist: https://www.equator-network.org/reporting-guidelines/spirit-2013-statement-defining-standard-protocol-items-for-clinical-trials/

Quality Improvement (QI)

SQUIRE

Statement: https://www.equator-network.org/reporting-guidelines/squire/

Checklist: https://www.equator-network.org/reporting-guidelines/squire/

Qualitative Research

SRQR

Guideline: https://journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/fulltext/2014/09000/Standards_for_Reporting_Qualitative_Research__A.21.aspx

Observational Studies in Epidemiology

STROBE

Checklists: https://www.equator-network.org/reporting-guidelines/strobe/

Manuscript Preparation

Manuscripts that do not adhere to the following instructions will be returned to the corresponding author for technical revision before undergoing peer review. JANAC only considers manuscripts prepared in the format specified by the American Psychological Association (APA; 7th ed.; www.apastyle.apa.org), the JANAC Author Guidelines, and the JANAC Style Guide (https://journals.lww.com/janac/Pages/informationforauthors.aspx). Please add sequential line numbering to your Word documents for the main manuscript (text) file. You will see that the system will also add line numbers when it creates the PDF of your submission, but these start over on each page and the reviewers prefer sequential numbering.

Manuscript submissions that are/have been posted as preprints must include a supplementary file that details the responses to the comments received on the posted preprint.

Please compose your manuscript in English with U.S. spelling, grammar, and punctuation conventions (these can be set on your computer). A clear and concise writing style is required. Manuscripts with poor use of the English language are likely to be rejected without further consideration / not sent out for peer review. Options for author services:

Types of Papers

  • feature manuscripts, including reports of original research and state-of-the-knowledge reviews;
  • research, practice, education, and program briefs;
  • case studies;
  • commentaries;
  • guest editorials (invited);
  • media reviews; and
  • letters to the editor

Feature articles

Submissions for feature articles should include the following:

  • title page, submitted in a separate file;
  • manuscript body that includes, in this order:
    • Page 1:
      • Abstract
      • 3-6 key words
    • Page 2, etc.:
      • Title (centered and not bolded),
      • Manuscript text (with appropriate headers),
      • References,
      • Key Considerations,
      • and Tables, if applicable
  • figures, if applicable in separate, individual files.

Feature articles should not exceed 30 pages on initial submission, not including the tables/figures. We accept a combined total of up to 5 tables and figures in feature manuscript submissions.

Other submissions

The following article types are also peer-reviewed:

  • research, practice, education, or program briefs;
  • case studies;
  • commentaries;

Please note: All pilot studies, preliminary reports, and QI project reports should be submitted as briefs. Commentaries are opinion pieces that represent the views of the authors but do not necessary represent the views of the editors, ANAC, or the publisher.

The following article types are reviewed by the editor(s), who may choose to seek input from additional reviewers:

  • guest editorials (by invitation only),
  • media reviews,
  • letters to the editor

All of these submissions should have the following components:

  • title page, submitted in a separate file;
  • abstract (briefs, case studies, commentaries);
  • key words, on title page for guest editorials, media reviews, letters to the editor; following the abstract for briefs, case studies, and commentaries;
  • manuscript body that includes in this order: title (centered and not bolded), text, references, and tables, if applicable;
  • key considerations (briefs, case studies, and commentaries), and
  • figures, if applicable, in individual, separate files. 

Manuscripts in this category should not exceed 10 pages on initial submission, not including the title page, references, or tables/figures. You may include no more than 3 tables and/or figures per manuscript. 

Style

Format your manuscript style after the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association, 7th edition, the JANAC Author Guidelines, and the JANAC Style Guide. When APA format and the JANAC guides disagree, follow the JANAC Author Guidelines or the JANAC Style Guide.


Components of a Manuscript

Title Page

The title of the submission should include the design type for the study (e.g., mixed methods), if original research, review, or brief and not exceed 150 characters, including spaces and punctuation. An effective title should comprise the following information:

  • topic (e.g., internalized stigma, PrEP update, adherence to ARTs)
  • population (e.g., MSM, women, adolescents)
  • geographic location (e.g., rural setting, urban FQHC, Southern United States, country name)
  • method: usually following a colon (e.g., cross-sectional study, a systematic review, a randomized trial)

The title page should include (a) each author’s credentials, (b) title/position, (c) affiliation, and (d) location (city and U.S. state spelled out [as appropriate], and country; e.g., Denver, Colorado, USA or Bogotá, Columbia).

Authors must include the contributions of each author in the Acknowledgment section, using the CRediT taxonomy (available at https://casrai.org/credit/). See the example title page in the JANAC style guide.

Identify the corresponding author and provide their email address. See the sample title page in the JANAC Style Guide. The title page should be submitted as a separate document to blind reviewers to information about the authors.

Conflict of Interest (COI)

Include your COI statement on the title page. If the author(s) has no conflicts of interest to declare (including relationships with pharmaceutical companies, biomedical device manufacturers, grantors, or other entities whose products or services are related to topics covered in this manuscript), this must be stated. The following is sample text for no real or perceived conflict of interest:

The author(s) report(s) no real or perceived vested interests related to this article that could be construed as a conflict of interest.

The following is sample text for disclosure of a real or perceived conflict of interest:

This study was funded in part by ABC Corporation and grant #1-234-5678 from DEF Foundation (Kim Li, PI). Kyle Goldman reports having received lecture fees from XYZ Laboratories. Chris Gallegos disclosed consulting fees from 123, Inc. Pat Jones reports no financial interests or potential conflicts of interest.

Acknowledgments

Please acknowledge all sources of funding relevant to the manuscript in an Acknowledgment Statement on the title page of the manuscript; include grant numbers and PI names. If you have no funding sources to report, state “No funding was received.” This is also an appropriate place to acknowledge assistance from non-author colleagues.

Key Words

Key words follow the abstract for features, briefs, case studies, and commentaries, and are placed at the end of the title page for guest editorials, media reviews, and letters to the editor. Include the design type as a key word for feature (research and review) articles.

Manuscript Body

The main manuscript pages should be numbered consecutively; please include a running head.

Abstract (feature articles, briefs, case studies, commentaries)

Abstracts should contain no more than 150 words and should appear on the first page of the manuscript before the main body of the manuscript. Authors will be asked to provide a separate copy of the abstract as part of the submission process. You may cut and paste your abstract into the submission box in the editorial management system.

Key words

Provide at least 3 and no more than 6 key words. Key words related to the content of the manuscript should be listed in alphabetical order and separated by commas.

For research papers, case studies, and briefs: key words should include design/method (e.g., cross-sectional study, systematic review, randomized trial, practice improvement project, RCT, descriptive study, observational study, phenomenological study); population (e.g., transmen, MSM, women, Hispanic youth); and key variables (e.g., health literacy, stigma, substance use).

For feature (research and review), briefs, case studies, and commentaries, place key words after the abstract on the first page of the manuscript. (For guest editorials, media reviews, and letters to the editor, place key words at the end of the title page.)

Content

The main body of the paper should follow all style requirements included in this document. You may use up to 3 level headers (and no more). Note: this differs from APA format. Use headers as shown in the box below.

Centered, Capped, and Bolded for Main Headers (Level 1)

   Start your text for this section one line down and indented as you would for the beginning of a new paragraph. Do not use “Introduction” as a header – the title takes the place of that header.

Left Justified, Capped, and Bolded (Level 2)

   Start your text for this section one line down and indented as you would for the beginning of a new paragraph.

Indented and italicized, cap first word only, and end with a period (Level 3). Start your text for this section immediately after the header period.

References

The reference list should start on a new page after the end of the body of the paper. The list should represent current literature and appropriate historical references that have been used in the body of the paper as citations or referenced in the tables and/or figures. References should be limited to about 30 for research manuscripts; review manuscripts (e.g., systematic reviews, integrative reviews, qualitative metasummaries/metasynthesis) may use more references, but with restraint; brief submissions should limit references to 10-15. See samples of references and citations in the JANAC Style Guide​.

Citations to content published in other languages must include the English translation in the reference list and a working URL to an accessible version of the content or a PDF of the content must be submitted with the manuscript files.

Key Considerations (feature articles, briefs, case studies, commentaries)

Include 3-6 key points from the manuscript, with a focus on clinical applications. Points should be presented in a bulleted list and should start on a new page following the reference list. Key Considerations are not a rehash or synopsis of the paper. Key considerations should include pertinent concepts that can be reasonably derived from the manuscript and how they apply to the care of people living with HIV and related conditions. Think of these as the take-home messages from your paper.

Tables

Tables are encouraged if they help the reader better understand the text. Tables should be self-explanatory and enhance, not duplicate, the text. Cite tables consecutively in the text and number them in that order. Tables should be appended to the manuscript after the reference list. They should not be embedded in the text.

Create tables using the table creating and editing feature of the word processing software (i.e., Microsoft Word). Place single-line borders around all cells. Do not use Excel or comparable spreadsheet programs. All abbreviations and acronyms in the table should be defined in a “Note.” below the table; explanatory notes may also be placed here.

Tables should be placed after the Key Considerations (feature manuscript) or references (all other manuscripts), with each table starting on a new page. Tables should be numbered, titled, and presented in numerical order.

Figures

Figures, including photographs, are encouraged if they help the reader better understand the text. Figures should be self-explanatory and enhance, not duplicate, the text. Cite figures consecutively in the text and number them in the order in which they are discussed. Figures should be appended to the manuscript after the reference list. They should not be embedded in the text. If using photographs of identifiable people, you will need written permission from the subject to publish the photograph. Covering the eyes does not make the subject unidentifiable.

Titles should appear below the figure. Abbreviations in the figure should be defined in a “Note.” below the title of the figure; explanatory notes may also be placed here. Please number figures in the sequence they are referred to in the paper. Figures should be submitted as individual, separate files.

Figures developed using digital art should be created/scanned, saved, and submitted as a TIFF (tagged image file format), an EPS (encapsulated postscript) file, or a PPT (Power Point) file. Electronic photographs-radiographs, CT scans, and scanned images must have a resolution of at least 300 dpi (dots per inch). Line art must have a resolution of at least 1200 dpi. If fonts are used in the artwork, they must be converted to paths or outlines or they must be embedded in the files. Color images must be created/scanned, saved, and submitted as CMYK files. If you do not have the capability to create CMYK files, please disregard this step. Indicate in your cover letter that you are unable to produce CMYK files.

For a step-by-step guide for submitting digital art, please visit www.LWWonline.com. Click "For Authors," then click "Artwork" in the menu to the right. Visit the "Digital Art Checklist" and "5 Steps for Creating Digital Artwork" for specific guidelines.

Supplemental Digital Content: Size and File Type Requirements

Authors may submit supplemental digital content (SDC) to enhance the manuscript text. SDC will be considered for online-only posting. SDC may include the following types of content: text documents, graphs, tables, figures, graphics, illustrations, audio, video, interview guides.

If a systematic review was not registered with PROSPERO prior to data extraction, the author(s) are asked to include a systematic review protocol equivalent to the elements associated with PROSPERO registration as submit as SDC.

All SDC will be peer reviewed.​

SDC files should be no larger than 10 MB each. Documents, graphs, and tables may be presented in any format. Figures, graphics, and illustrations should be submitted with the following file extensions: .tif, .eps, .ppt, .jpg, .pdf, .gif. Audio files should be submitted with the following file extensions: .mp3, .wma. Video files should be submitted with the following file extensions: .wmv, .mov, .qt, .mpg, .mpeg, .mp4. Video files should also be formatted with a 320 X 240 pixel minimum screen size. For more information, please review LWW's requirements for submitting supplemental digital content.

Citing SDC in text and master list compilation

Cite all SDC consecutively in the text. Citations should: include the type of material submitted, be clearly labeled as "Supplemental Digital Content," include a sequential number, and provide a brief description of the supplemental content. Audio and video citations should also include the length (in minutes) and size (in MB) of the file.

Provide a list of all SDC in-text citations, in the order in which they were cited in the text, immediately following your list of references. Citations listed on the SDC page must be numbered to match the citations from the text. Include a title and a brief summary of the content. For audio and video files, also include the author name, videographer, participants, length (in minutes), and size (in MB).

Follow the format below for SDC citations in text and on the citation summary page after your reference list. This will allow production staff to slot the URL they create with the SDC file into the article. The legend citation page after the reference list helps production easily see how many SDC items to look for in the text. The legend will be removed before publication; it is only there as a marker for production.

Example of Text Citation of SDC

"Motivational interviewing includes a number of counseling skills and motivational techniques” (See Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, which shows a motivational interviewing session with explanatory notes, 5 minutes, 10MB). Motivational interviewing session in which a nurse counsels a patient about adherence to antiretroviral therapy using reframing, active listening, focused questioning techniques, ...

Example of Master List Compilation of all SDC Citations at end of Manuscript

Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, shows a nurse interacting with a person living with HIV.

  • Author: Frank Simmons
  • Videographer: Jeanette Baca
  • Participants: Nurse and patient
  • Length: 6.2 minutes
  • Size: 10MB

Manuscript Submission 

All manuscripts must be submitted online. See our submission instructions.

First-time users: Click the Register button from the menu located at the top of the page and enter the requested information. Upon successful registration, you will be sent an email indicating your user name and password. Print a copy of this information for future reference. Note: If you have ever received an email from us with an assigned user ID and password, or if you are a repeat user, do not register again. Once you have an assigned ID and password, you do not have to re-register, even if your status changes (i.e., author, reviewer, or editor). 

Established authors: Click the log-in button from the menu located at the top of the page and log in to the system. If you are submitting a paper, log in as an Author. Submit your manuscript according to the author instructions. You will be able to track the progress of your manuscript through the system. If you experience any problems, please contact Adam A. Gordon, Managing Editor, at [email protected]

Peer Review

All submissions undergo a first level review by either the Editor-in-Chief or an Associate Editor to determine appropriateness for the journal. Those deemed appropriate are then evaluated by at least two members of the review panel, using a double-blind peer review process (authors and reviewers are blinded to each other). Reviewers help the editor determine your manuscript’s relevance and significance, the degree to which it advances knowledge, the quality of scholarly presentation, the integrity of research methods, including protection of human subjects, and clinical content relevant to nursing practice and HIV care. Guest editorials, media reviews, and letters to the editor are reviewed by the Editor-in-Chief; an Associate Editor and/or individuals from the journal’s review panel may also provide double-blinded reviews at the editor’s discretion. 

After Acceptance 
Page proofs and corrections: Corresponding authors will receive electronic page proofs to check the copyedited and typeset article before publication. An email will be sent with instructions on how to access the Portable document format (PDF) files of the typeset pages using your Editorial Manager login and password. Complete instructions will be provided with the email for downloading and submitting the corrected page proofs to the publisher. It is the author's responsibility to ensure that there are no errors in the proofs. Changes that have been made to conform to journal style will stand if they do not alter the authors' meaning. Only the most critical changes to the accuracy of the content will be made. Changes that are stylistic or are a reworking of previously accepted material will be disallowed. The publisher reserves the right to deny any changes that do not affect the accuracy of the content. Authors may be charged for alterations to the proofs beyond those required to correct errors or to answer queries. Proofs must be checked carefully and corrections returned within 48 hours of receipt, as requested in the cover letter accompanying the page proofs.

Publication Ahead-of-Print (PAP): PAP provides rapid access to important new data and enables authors to cite their work promptly. All accepted submissions with completed copyright and disclosure forms will be published as PAP after the author has reviewed the page proofs. To avoid errors and delays, submitted manuscripts must be carefully proofed by authors during the page proof stage.

Print Publication

Most, but not all, accepted manuscripts are published in print in our bi-monthly issues. Some manuscripts, due to length or urgent need for publication, are published online only and included in the table of contents of a print issue.

Reprints
Authors are emailed a reprint notification letter with a link to the order form soon after their article publishes in the journal (and not before). Questions about this can be directed to [email protected].​