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Implementation of an Activity-Monitoring System in Hospital-Based COPD Patients

A Retrospective Cohort Study

Wilson, Christopher M.; Burns, Grace; Bove, Jonathon; Ferranti, Vincenzo; McCown, Benjamin; Wiechec Seidell, Janet; Colombo, Reyna

Journal of Acute Care Physical Therapy : October 2019 - Volume 10 - Issue 4 - p 120–128
doi: 10.1097/JAT.0000000000000102
Original Studies
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Introduction: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder are at risk of complications after hospitalization, including readmissions. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of an activity-monitoring device on the outcomes of patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder during and after a hospital admission.

Methods: During a hospitalization, 52 patients (experimental group) diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder were provided with an activity monitor (Tractivity; (Kineteks Corporation, Vancouver, British Colombia, http://tractivity-online.squarespace.com/)) and 99 usual care patients were chosen as controls. Following hospital discharge, retrospective chart analysis examined patient demographics including falls, length of stay, discharge disposition, and hospital readmissions.

Results: No difference in number of falls, length of stay, discharge disposition, and hospital readmissions could be found between groups (P > .05). Within the experimental group, those who were discharged home (n = 45) displayed a greater daily activity, number of steps, and ambulation distance as compared with patients who were discharged to another facility (n = 7, P < .05).

Discussion: Readmissions are multifactorial and activity during a hospitalization may not be the primary cause of readmissions. Activity monitoring can help quantify ambulation and may be useful as a means to predict discharge disposition.

Conclusion: No clear effect of using an activity monitor could be found on length of stay, readmission rates, and discharge disposition between the 2 groups. However, less activity and shorter ambulation distance were associated with discharge to another facility instead of home.

Christopher M. Wilson, PT, DPT, DScPT Physical Therapy Program, School of Health Sciences, Oakland University, 433 Meadowbrook Rd Rochester, MI 48309 (USA). wilson23@oakland.edu.

Physical and Occupational Therapy Department, Beaumont Hospital, Troy, Michigan.

Grace Burns, PT, DPT Physical and Occupational Therapy Department, Beaumont Hospital, Troy, Michigan.

Jonathon Bove, PT, DPT Physical Therapy Program, School of Health Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan.

Vincenzo Ferranti, PT, DPT Physical Therapy Program, School of Health Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan.

Benjamin McCown, PT, DPT Physical Therapy Program, School of Health Sciences, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan.

Janet Wiechec Seidell, PT, MPT Physical and Occupational Therapy Department, Beaumont Hospital, Troy, Michigan.

Reyna Colombo, PT, MA Physical and Occupational Therapy Department, Beaumont Hospital, Troy, Michigan.

Jonathon Bove, Vincenzo Ferranti, and Benjamin McCown participated in this study as a partial requirement for graduation from the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program at Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan.

This study received approval after an expedited review from the Beaumont Health's (Royal Oak, Michigan) institutional review board (IRB) #2017-236 and Oakland University's (Rochester, Michigan) institutional review board (#1115304-1).

The authors have no conflicts of interest and no source of funding to declare.

© 2019 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.
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