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Symbrachydactyly

Finger nubbins are not always amniotic band disruption sequence

Mills, Janith K., MPAS, PA-C; Butler, Lesley, MPH; Mills, Elisa M.; Oishi, Scott N., MD

Journal of the American Academy of PAs: April 2019 - Volume 32 - Issue 4 - p 32–37
doi: 10.1097/01.JAA.0000553383.75260.0c
Review Article
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ABSTRACT Although congenital hand anomalies associated with finger nubbins may be produced by amniotic band disruption sequence (ABDS), symbrachydactyly should be considered in the differential diagnosis. ABDS usually affects more than one limb but symbrachydactyly largely is limited to one upper extremity, and has five distinct clinical presentations: short-fingered, atypical cleft, monodactylous, peromelic, and a forearm proximal transverse deficiency. This article discusses the diagnosis of symbrachydactyly compared with ABDS and outlines plans for managing patients with symbrachydactyly.

At the time this article was written, Janith K. Mills practiced at the Charles Seay, Jr., Hand Center at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children in Dallas. She now practices at the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at Children's Medical Center in Dallas. Lesley Butler was the research coordinator for the Charles Seay, Jr., Hand Center at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children and Elisa M. Mills was a research intern at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children when this article was written. Scott N. Oishi is director of the Charles E. Seay, Jr., Hand Center at Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children and a professor in the departments of orthopedic surgery and plastic surgery at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. The authors have disclosed no potential conflicts of interest, financial or otherwise.

Copyright © 2019 American Academy of Physician Assistants
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