Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Hallux Rigidus Grade Does Not Correlate With Foot and Ankle Ability Measure Score

Nixon, Devon C. MD; Lorbeer, Karly F. MD; McCormick, Jeremy J. MD; Klein, Sandra E. MD; Johnson, Jeffrey E. MD

JAAOS - Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: September 2017 - Volume 25 - Issue 9 - p 648–653
doi: 10.5435/JAAOS-D-16-00878
Research Article

Introduction: Classification systems for hallux rigidus imply that, as radiographic changes progress, symptoms will concurrently increase in severity. However, symptom intensity and radiographic severity can be discordant for many patients. We studied the correlation between hallux rigidus grades and the Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM) scores to better understand this relationship.

Methods: We retrospectively reviewed weight-bearing radiographs of the foot and FAAM Activities of Daily Living (ADL) questionnaires for 84 patients with hallux rigidus. The Spearman rank coefficient was used to correlate clinical-radiographic hallux rigidus grade with FAAM ADL scores.

Results: In 84 patients, the clinical-radiographic grade for hallux rigidus showed no relationship with FAAM ADL score (r = −0.10; P = 0.36) but did show moderate correlation with patient age (r = 0.63; P < 0.001).

Discussion: Advancing radiographic changes in hallux rigidus did not correspond with patient symptoms as measured via FAAM ADL scores.

Conclusion: The reliability and validity of current grading criteria for hallux rigidus may require further exploration.

Level of Evidence: Level III

From the Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO.

Correspondence to Dr. Johnson: johnsonj@wudosis.wustl.edu

Dr. McCormick or an immediate family member is a member of a speakers’ bureau or has made paid presentations on behalf of and serves as a paid consultant to Wright Medical Group; has received research or institutional support from Midwest Stone Institute and Wright Medical Group; has received nonincome support (such as equipment or services), commercially derived honoraria, or other non–research-related funding (such as paid travel) from Arthrex, Midwest Stone Institute, and Wright Medical Group; and serves as a board member, owner, officer, or committee member of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons and the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society. Dr. Klein or an immediate family member serves as a board member, owner, officer, or committee member of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society. Dr. Johnson or an immediate family member has received royalties from Wright Medical Technology; serves as an unpaid consultant to and has stock or stock options held in CrossRoads Extremity Solutions; has received nonincome support (such as equipment or services), commercially derived honoraria, or other non–research-related funding (such as paid travel) from Arthrex; and serves as a board member, owner, officer, or committee member of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society, the MidAmerica Orthopaedic Association, and the International Federation of Foot and Ankle Societies. Neither of the following authors nor any immediate family member has received anything of value from or has stock or stock options held in a commercial company or institution related directly or indirectly to the subject of this article: Dr. Nixon and Dr. Lorbeer.

Received November 22, 2016

Accepted February 19, 2017

© 2017 by American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
You currently do not have access to this article

To access this article:

Note: If your society membership provides full-access, you may need to login on your society website