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Decreased Hip Internal Rotation Increases the Risk of Back and Abdominal Muscle Injuries in Professional Baseball Players: Analysis of 258 Player-seasons

Camp, Christopher, L., MD; Spiker, Andrea, M., MD; Zajac, John, M., DPT, SCS, OCS, CSCS; Pearson, Dave, ATC, MPT, MS, CSCS; Sinatro, Alec, M., BA; Dines, Joshua, S., MD; Ranawat, Anil, S., MD; Coleman, Struan, H., MD

JAAOS - Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: May 1, 2018 - Volume 26 - Issue 9 - p e198–e206
doi: 10.5435/JAAOS-D-17-00223
Research Article

Introduction: The relationship of hip range of motion (ROM) to shoulder, elbow, abdominal, and back injuries remains undefined.

Methods: We assessed hip ROM on players reporting to Major League Spring Training for an organization over six seasons (2010 to 2015). Hip ROM was correlated with player abdominal, back, shoulder, and elbow injury status for those seasons using multivariate binomial logistic regression analysis.

Results: A total of 258 player-seasons (129 pitchers and 129 position players) resulted in 20 back and 35 abdominal injuries across all players and 28 elbow and 25 shoulder injuries in pitchers. Hip ROM did not correlate with shoulder or elbow injuries. Hip internal rotation deficit of 5° correlated with core injury (odds ratio [OR], 1.40; P = 0.024 for pitchers; OR, 1.35; P = 0.026 for position players) and back injury (OR, 1.160; P = 0.022 for pitchers).

Discussion: Hip internal rotation deficits were predictive of back and abdominal injuries but not shoulder or elbow injury.

From the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (Dr. Camp), the Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY (Dr. Spiker, Mr. Sinatro, Dr. Dines, Dr. Ranawat, and Dr. Coleman), and the New York Mets Baseball Club, New York (Dr. Zajac and Mr. Pearson).

Correspondence to Dr. Camp: camp.christopher@mayo.edu

Dr. Dines has received royalties from Linvatec; is a member of a speakers' bureau or has made paid presentations on behalf of Arthrex; serves as a paid consultant to Arthrex, CONMED Linvatec, and Trice; has received research support as a principal investigator from Arthrex; has received royalties and financial or material support from Wolters Kluwer Health–Lippincott Williams & Wilkins and Medical/Orthopaedic publications editorial/governing board (American Journal of Orthopedics and Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery); and is a board member or committee member of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons. Dr. Ranawat has received royalties from DePuy and Stryker Mako; is a member of a speakers' bureau or has made paid presentations on behalf of Arthrex, Ceramtec, Medtronic, and Stryker Mako; serves as a paid consultant to Arthrex, Ceramtec, Medtronic, Moximed, and Stryker MAKO; holds stock or stock options in ConforMIS; has received research support as a principal investigator from Arthrex, DePuy Mitek-Synthes, and Stryker; has received royalties and financial or material support from Saunders/Mosby-Elsevier and Springer and Medical/Orthopaedic publications editorial/governing board (Current Trends in Musculoskeletal Medicine and Journal of Arthroplasty); and is a board member or committee member of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine and EOA. Dr. Coleman has received royalties from Blue Belt Technologies; serves as a paid consultant to Stryker and Pivot Medical; and holds stock or stock options in Blue Belt Technologies and Cymedica Orthopedics. None of the following authors or any immediate family member has received anything of value from or has stock or stock options held in a commercial company or institution related directly or indirectly to the subject of this article: Dr. Camp, Dr. Spiker, Dr. Zajac, Mr. Pearson, and Mr. Sinatro.

© 2018 by American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
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