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Golf Injuries: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Treatment

Zouzias, Ioannis C. MD; Hendra, Jeff MSPT, MTC, SCS; Stodelle, Jason MSPT, ATC, OCS; Limpisvasti, Orr MD

JAAOS - Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons: February 15, 2018 - Volume 26 - Issue 4 - p 116–123
doi: 10.5435/JAAOS-D-15-00433
Review Article

Increasing numbers of people are playing golf. Golf is a unique sport in that the ability to participate at a high level is not limited by age. In addition, participants tend to play more rather than less as they grow older. Injuries can occur at any point during the golf swing, from takeaway through follow-through. Upper extremity injuries can affect the hands, elbow, and shoulder and are usually a result of the golf swing at impact. Injuries are also common in the lower back as well as the lower extremities. Most injuries are the result of overuse and poor swing mechanics. When treating golfers, it is important to have a good understanding of the biomechanics and forces of the golf swing to diagnose and manage the vast spectrum of injuries incurred in this sport.

From the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, NYU Winthrop Hospital, Mineola, NY (Dr. Zouzias), Physiofitness Associates, Dublin, OH (Mr. Hendra and Mr. Stodelle), and the Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic, Los Angeles, CA (Dr. Limpisvasti).

Dr. Limpisvasti or an immediate family member serves as a paid consultant to Össur, CONMED Linvatec, and Physiotherapy Associates and serves as a board member, owner, officer, or committee member of the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine. None of the following authors or any immediate family member has received anything of value from or has stock or stock options held in a commercial company or institution related directly or indirectly to the subject of this article: Dr. Zouzias, Mr. Hendra, and Mr. Stodelle.

Received September 24, 2015

Accepted October 24, 2016

© 2018 by American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
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