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Vaccine hesitancy

Not a new phenomenon, but a new threat

Koslap-Petraco, Mary DNP, PPCNP, CPNP, FAANP (Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor)1

Section Editor(s): Goolsby, Mary Jo EdD, MSN, NP-C, FAANP

Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners: November 2019 - Volume 31 - Issue 11 - p 624–626
doi: 10.1097/JXX.0000000000000342
The Fellows Speak
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ABSTRACT Vaccines have been recognized as one of the top 10 public health achievements of the 20th century. In 1998, a study on the connection between measles, mumps, rubella vaccine and autism was published by the now discredited Andrew Wakefield. That study was retracted in 2010, but the damage was already done. The purpose of this article is to review the history of vaccine hesitancy and discuss a successful paradigm for speaking with vaccine-hesitant parents. Discussion of immunizations related to public health law and religious exemptions will also be reviewed.

1Stony Brook University School of Nursing, Nurse Consultant Immunization Action Coalition, CEO Pediatric Nurse Practitioner House Calls, Stony Brook, New York

Correspondence: Mary Koslap-Petraco, DNP, PPCNP, CPNP, FAANP, Stony Brook University School of Nursing, Nurse Consultant Immunization Action Coalition, CEO Pediatric Nurse Practitioner House Calls, 240 Abbey St, Massapequa Park,, NY 11762. Tel: 516-492-7881; Fax: 516-798-0392; E-mail: petraconp@gmail.com

Competing interests: The author reports no conflicts of interest.

© 2019 American Association of Nurse Practitioners
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