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Finding a Common Lens

Competencies Across Professional Disciplines Providing Early Childhood Intervention

Bruder, Mary Beth PhD; Catalino, Tricia DSc, PT; Chiarello, Lisa A. PT, PhD, FAPTA; Mitchell, Marica Cox MS; Deppe, Janet MS, CCC-SLP; Gundler, Darla MA; Kemp, Peggy PhD; LeMoine, Sarah MS; Long, Toby PhD, PT, FAPTA; Muhlenhaupt, Mary OTD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Prelock, Patricia PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-CL; Schefkind, Sandra OTD, OTR/L, FAOTA; Stayton, Vicki PhD; Ziegler, Deborah EdD

doi: 10.1097/IYC.0000000000000153
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The Early Childhood Personnel Center (ECPC) was funded by the Office of Special Education Programs at the U.S. Department of Education to provide technical assistance to State Systems of Early Childhood Intervention and Institutions of Higher Education on issues related to personnel development. One initiative of the ECPC has been to collaborate with professional organizations to identify core cross-disciplinary competencies for all personnel serving infants and young children aged birth through 5 years with disabilities and their families. Seven national organizations representing disciplines providing services in early childhood intervention have been participating in this initiative: the American Occupational Therapy Association; the American Physical Therapy Association; the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association; the Council for Exceptional Children and the Division for Early Childhood; the National Association for the Education of Young Children; and Zero to Three. Alignments of personnel standards, practice guidelines, and competencies yielded 4 areas of competence that are common across service providers serving infants and young children with disabilities and their families. These are: Collaboration and Coordination; Family-Centered Practice; Evidence-Based Practice; and Professionalism.

Early Childhood Personnel Center, University of Connecticut (Dr Bruder); Hawai'i Pacific University, Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy (Dr Catalino); Drexel University, Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy (Dr Chiarello); Bainum Family Foundation (Ms Cox Mitchell); American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (Ms Deppe); Federation for Children with Special Needs, Early Childhood Personnel Center (Ms Gundler); Division for Early Childhood, Council for Exceptional Children (Dr Kemp); Zero to Three (Ms LeMoine); Georgetown University, Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy (Dr Long); Thomas Jefferson University, American Occupational Therapy Association (Dr Muhlenhaupt); University of Vermont, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (Dr Prelock); American Occupational Therapy Association (Dr Schefkind); Early Childhood Personnel Center (Dr Stayton); Council for Exceptional Children (Dr Ziegler).

Correspondence: Mary Beth Bruder, PhD, Early Childhood Personnel Center, University of Connecticut, 263 Farmington Ave, MC 6222, Farmington, CT 06030 (bruder@uchc.edu).

Marica Cox Mitchell worked at the National Association for the Education of Young Children during the writing of this article.

All authors contributed equally to this article.

The preparation of this article was supported, in part, with funding for the Early Childhood Personnel Center, University of Connecticut Health Center from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs (H235B170008). The opinions expressed, however, are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the positions of either the Department or the Office.

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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