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RUNGE VAL M. MD; CLANTON, JEFFREY A. MS, RPH; FOSTER, MARGARET A. PHD; SMITH, FRANCIS W. MB, CHB; LUKEHART, CHARLES M. PHD; JONES, MARK M. PHD; LEON PARTAIN, J C. PHD, MD, AND; JAMES, A. EVERETTE JR. SCM, JD, MD
Investigative Radiology: September-October 1984
Original Investigations: PDF Only
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Paramagnetic ions could be theoretically used as NMR contrast agents because of their effect upon Ti. However, the toxicity of these ions prevents their application. By the formation of appropriate chemical complexes with these ions, the toxicity of these agents can be substantially reduced while maintaining the paramagnetic effect. Two potential NMR contrast agents, one for oral use and one for intravenous administration, were developed and evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. The effect upon T1 in vitro of these paramagnetic compounds was determined using a JEOL FX-90Q NMR spectrometer. These agents were evaluated in vivo in dogs with a Technicare 0.3 tesla superconducting magnet system and in rabbits with the Aberdeen 0.04 tesla resistive NMR imager. Using calculated T1 NMR images, a nontoxic dose of gadolinium oxalate provided visualization of the gastrointestinal tract. Intravenous administration of chromium EDTA provided enhancement of the kidneys, ureters, and bladder, thereby potentially allowing for the evaluation of renal function with magnetic resonance imaging. Stable paramagnetic complexes can serve as effective, nontoxic, oral and intravenous NMR contrast agents.

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