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GARNIC J DANIEL MD; MOORE, STEPHEN C. PhD; JUDY, PHILIP F. PhD; HARRINGTON, DONALD P. MD; LOIS, JUAN MD; LEVIN, DAVID C. MD
Investigative Radiology: September-October 1983
Original Investigations: PDF Only
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Cardiac motion introduces significant artifacts into standard CT images obtained through the heart. A newly developed prospectively gated CT system produced 87 gated scan sets in ten normal and infarcted dogs. Each cycle can provide up to 24 37-70 msec composite images of one transverse slice, equally spaced in time through the cardiac cycle. Eight to 12 2-second scans, obtained during a constant infusion of contrast, were required to collect the data for each gated set. The left and right ventricular myocardium was clearly seen, regions of myocardial infarction were identified, and atrial and ventricular filling and emptying were visualized. In areas of infarction, wall thickness was unchanged from diastole to systole. In addition to improved resolution, a gated CT series evaluation of wall motion abnormalities may provide a better means of locating myocardial infarction than the ungated CT image.

© Lippincott-Raven Publishers.