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McAFEE J G; KRAUSS, D J; SUBRAMANIAN, G; THOMAS, F D; ROSKOPF, M; RITTER, C; LYONS, B; SCHOONMAKER, J E; FINN, R D
Investigative Radiology: September-October 1983
Original Investigations: PDF Only
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The 3-hour biodistribution of 99mTc complexes of five diphosphonates (HMDP, NMMDP, DMAD, DPD, and APD), imidodiphosphonate (IDP), and pyrophosphate (PYP) was compared in rats with segmental renal infarction induced by a 1-hour occlusion of a renal artery branch. 95mTc labeled MDP was a reference substance in all animals. Three agents (APD, HMDP and IDP) had a higher infarct/normal kidney concentration ratio than MDP, the latter two by virtue of a lower content in normal kidney. HMDP, DPD, and IDP had very high liver concentrations. DPD showed relatively high concentrations in soft tissues and blood. The blood and kidney levels of PYP were higher than those of MDP but the infarct/normal kidney ratios were similar. None of the agents had a higher uptake in bone than MDP: four had a significantly lower uptake.

The increased concentration of 99mTc MDP in the infarcts was readily seen in camera images one day after renal artery occlusion, but not at three or seven days. Increased diphosphonate uptake was accompanied by an influx of calcium in both cortex and medulla. The accumulation of diphosphonate in areas of infarction was not modified by infusions of verapamil or Captopril.

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