Frequency, risk factors, and impacts on quality of life of the restless legs syndrome and side effects among antidepressant users in a tertiary hospital: an observational cross-sectional study : International Clinical Psychopharmacology

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Frequency, risk factors, and impacts on quality of life of the restless legs syndrome and side effects among antidepressant users in a tertiary hospital: an observational cross-sectional study

Cetin Erdem, Haticea; Kara, Huseyinb; Ozcelik, Ozgenb; Donmez, Leventc; Eryilmaz, Mehmetb; Ozbey, Guld

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International Clinical Psychopharmacology 38(4):p 209-215, July 2023. | DOI: 10.1097/YIC.0000000000000466

Abstract

Restless leg syndrome (RLS) is a common but underestimated sensorimotor disorder that significantly affects the quality of life (QoL) which can be induced by antidepressants. This study aims to investigate the frequency and potential risk factors of RLS and side effects in selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors/serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SSRI/SNRI) users. This cross-sectional study included 198 outpatients who received SSRI/SNRI for 4–8 weeks. Clinical evaluation was performed using the International Restless Leg Syndrome Study Group rating scale for RLS, Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser side effects rating scale, and a short form 36 (SF-36) questionnaire for QoL. The frequency of RLS was 25%. RLS significantly increased with smoking and habituality. Also, habituality increased neurologic side effects reporting. The use of antipsychotics and calcium channel blockers decreased reporting of autonomic side effects. QoL decreased with RLS, psychiatric, neurologic, autonomic, and other side effects in different domains of SF-36. These findings suggested that SSRI/SNRI use could be associated with a higher risk of RLS, especially in smokers. QoL could be influenced negatively by RLS and all side effects. However, further prospective studies are needed to confirm these associations in large samples.

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