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Ridge Architecture Preservation Following Minimally Traumatic Exodontia Techniques and Guided Tissue Regeneration

Faciola Pessôa de Oliveira, Paula Gabriela DDS, MSci*; Pedroso Bergamo, Edmara Tatiely DDS, MSci; Bordin, Dimorvan DDS, MSci; Arbex, Leticia BSci§; Konrad, Danielle DDS; Gil, Luiz Fernando DDS, MSci, PhD; Neiva, Rodrigo DDS, MSci#; Tovar, Nick PhD§; Witek, Lukasz MSci, PhD**; Coelho, Paulo Guilherme DDS, MSci, PhD††

doi: 10.1097/ID.0000000000000886
Basic and Clinical Research
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Objective: To compare hard-tissue healing after 3 exodontia approaches.

Materials and Methods: Premolars of dogs were extracted: (1) flapless, (2) flap, and (3) flap + socket coverage with polytetrafluoroethylene (dPTFE) nonresorbable membrane (flap + dPTFE). Animals were euthanized at 1 and 4 weeks. Amount of bone formation within socket and socket total area were measured.

Results: Amount of bone formation revealed significant difference between 1 and 4 weeks; however, there was no differences among groups. Socket total area decreased after 4 weeks, and the flap + dPTFE group showed significantly higher socket total area. As a function of time and group, flap + dPTFE 4 weeks presented similar socket total area values relative to flap + dPTFE at 1 week, and significantly higher socket total area than flapless and flap. The histological sections revealed almost no bone formation within socket after 1 week, which increased for all groups at 4 weeks.

Conclusion: Socket coverage with polytetrafluoroethylene (dPTFE) membrane showed to effectively preserve bone architecture. Bone formation within sockets was not influenced by tooth extraction technique.

*PhD student, Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University, New York, NY; PhD student, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Periodontology, School of Dentistry of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil.

PhD student, Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University, New York, NY; PhD student, Prosthodontics and Periodontology Department Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil.

PhD student, Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University, New York, NY; PhD student, Prosthodontics and Periodontology Department, Piracicaba Dental School, University of Campinas, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil; Professor, Departament of Restorative Dentistry, University of Guarulhos, Guarulhos, SP, Brazil.

§Undergraduate Researcher, Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University, New York, NY.

Dental Resident, Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA.

Associate Professor, Department of Morphological Sciences, Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianópolis, Santa Catarina, Brazil.

#Associate Professor, Department of Periodontology, University of Florida College of Dentistry, Gainesville, FL.

**Assistant Professor, Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University, New York, NY.

††Professor, Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, New York University, New York, NY.

Reprint requests and correspondence to: Paulo Guilherme Coelho, DDS, MSci, PhD, Department of Biomaterials and Biomimetics, NYU College of Dentistry, 433 1st Avenue room 844, New York, NY 10010, Phone: +1 212 998 9214, Fax: +1 212 995 4244, E-mail: pgcoelho@nyu.edu

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