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A Retrospective Study of Sintered Porous-Surfaced Dental Implants in Restoring the Edentulous Posterior Mandible: Up to 9 Years of Functioning

Sohn, Dong-Seok DDS, PhD*; Kim, Woo-Sung DDS; Lee, Won-Hyuk DDS; Jung, Heui-Seung DDS§; Shin, Im-Hee PhD

doi: 10.1097/ID.0b013e3181ed2cee
Basic and Clinical Research
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Purpose: The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the survival rate of sintered porous-surfaced implants placed in the edentulous posterior mandibles, in relation to implant length and diameter, crown-to-implant ratio, and types of prostheses, for a maximum of 9 years of functioning (mean: 55.8 months; range: 5–108 months).

Materials: The study group consisted of 43 partially edentulous patients who visited Catholic University Hospital of Daegu and 1 private dental clinic. A total of 122 sintered porous-surfaced implants—Endopore (Innova Life Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada)—were placed in the edentulous posterior mandibles. Two diameter sizes (4.1 and 5.0 mm) and 4 lengths (5.0, 7.0, 9.0, and 12.0 mm) were used. All implants were restored with fixed prostheses. One hundred three implants were splinted and 21 implants were nonsplinted. Panoramic views and periapical radiographs were taken at the time of the first, postoperative, crown placement, and following checkup visits. The survival rates of the implants in relation to length, diameter, crown-to-implant ratio, and types of prostheses were investigated. Statistical data were analyzed using SPSS Win.Ver 14.0 software with the χ2 test.

Results: The survival rate of the 4.1-mm-diameter implants was 100% and 91.2% for the 5.0-mm-diameter implants. The survival rates of the implants of differing diameters were found to be statistically different (P = 0.005). The survival rates of both the 5.0-mm and 7.0-mm-length implants were 100%. The survival rate of the 9.0-mm-length implants was 97.9% and for the 12.0-mm-length implants was 95.1%. There was no statistical difference in survival rates for the differing lengths of implants. Of the 103 prostheses that were splinted, the survival rate was 98.0%. The survival rate of splinted prostheses was higher than that of the nonsplinted prostheses but was found to be not statistically different. There were no failed cases when the crown-to-implant ratio was <1.0. When the crown-to-implant ratio was between 1.0 and 1.4, the failure rate of the implants was 6.7%. No failure was recorded with the ratio range of 1.5 to 2.0. Relative to the crown-to-implant ratio of 1.0, the failure rates were statistically different (P = 0.048).

Conclusion: The cumulative survival rate of the porous-surfaced implants placed in the edentulous posterior mandibles was 97.5%. Short porous-surfaced implants showed satisfactory results after a maximum of 9 years of functioning in the edentulous posterior mandibles.

*Professor and Chairman, Department of Dentistry and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Catholic University Hospital of Daegu, Daegu, Republic of Korea.

†Resident, Department of Dentistry and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Catholic University Hospital of Daegu, Daegu, Republic of Korea.

‡Clinical Instructor, Department of Dentistry and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Catholic University Hospital of Daegu, Daegu, Republic of Korea.

§Private Practice, Seo-Mun Dental Clinic, Daegu, Republic of Korea.

∥Associate Professor, Department of Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu, Republic of Korea.

Reprint requests and correspondence to: Dong-Seok Sohn, DDS, PhD, Department of Dentistry and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Catholic University Hospital of Daegu, 3056-6 Daemyung 4-Dong Nam-Gu, Daegu, Republic of Korea 705-034, Phone: 82-53-650-4288, Fax: 82-53-622-7067, E-mail: dssohn@cu.ac.kr

© 2010 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.