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Anterior segment optical coherence tomography to differentiate adenoviral subepithelial infiltrates and scars

Gokhale, Nikhil S

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Indian Journal of Ophthalmology: October 2019 - Volume 67 - Issue 10 - p 1725
doi: 10.4103/ijo.IJO_926_19
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Subepithelial corneal infiltrates often follow adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis.[1] They usually resolve over time, but in some, these can progress to permanent corneal scars. Anterior segment- optical coherence tomography (S-OCT) can be a very useful tool to differentiate reversible infiltrates from irreversible scars and obviates the need for a steroid trial.

Subepithelial corneal infiltrates [Fig. 1a] appear on AS-OCT patchy, anterior stromal hyperreflective lesions with an intact Bowman's membrane and a uniform epithelial thickness [Fig. 1b]. On the other hand, scars [Fig. 1c] on AS-OCT appear as hyperreflective plaque-like lesions in the anterior stroma with disruption of the Bowman's membrane and variable epithelial thickness due to epithelial remodeling [Fig. 1d].

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Figure 1:
(a) Subepithelial corneal infiltrates. (b) Patchy hyperreflective lesions involving the anterior stroma just beneath the intact Bowman's membrane. (c) Permanent adenoviral scars. (d) Hyperreflective plaque-like lesions in the anterior stroma with disruption of the Bowman's membrane and variable epithelial thickness

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Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.

Reference

1. Dawson CR, Hanna L, Wood TR, Despain R. Adenovirus type 8 keratoconjunctivitis in the United States. 3. Epidemiologic, clinical, and microbiologic features Am J Ophthalmol. 1970;69:473–80
© 2019 Indian Journal of Ophthalmology | Published by Wolters Kluwer – Medknow