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Job Satisfaction Among Physician Assistants Practicing Cardiovascular Medicine in the United States

DePalma, Sondra M., DHSc, PA-C, DFAAPA, AACC; Alexander, Jeffrey L., PhD, FAACVPR; Matthews, Eric P., PhD

doi: 10.1097/HCM.0000000000000244
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We assessed overall job satisfaction and factors of job satisfaction among physician assistants (PAs) practicing cardiovascular medicine in the United States. Job satisfaction among health care providers is associated with provider satisfaction and retention, reduced health care costs, increased patient satisfaction, and improved health care. Research regarding job satisfaction among physicians and nurse practitioners has been conducted, but knowledge of job satisfaction among PAs is limited, dated, and inadequate. Job satisfaction among PAs in cardiology, a specialty with a disparity between provider supply and demand, has not been investigated. A quantitative, correlational, descriptive study was conducted using participants from the Association of Physician Assistants in Cardiology database. Overall job satisfaction, 45 factors of job satisfaction, and 6 composite factors were calculated. Correlational analysis was performed for factors most associated with overall job satisfaction. Overall job satisfaction was high. Most PAs (87.3%) were satisfied or very satisfied. Physician assistants were most satisfied with job factors related to challenge and autonomy, and these factors had the greatest correlation to overall job satisfaction. Findings can guide employers, health care administrators, and policy makers to promote job satisfaction among PAs in cardiology and provide insights into job satisfaction among PAs in general.

Author Affiliations: Regulatory and Professional Practice, American Academy of Physician Assistants, and PinnacleHealth CardioVascular Institute, Hanover, Pennsylvania (Dr DePalma); and College of Graduate Health Studies (Drs Alexander and Matthews) and Center for Resilience in Aging (Dr Alexander), A. T. Still University, Mesa, Arizona.

The authors have no funding or conflicts of interest to disclose.

Correspondence: Sondra M. DePalma, DHSc, PA-C, DFAAPA, AACC, 2318 Mill Rd., Ste. 1300, Alexandria, VA 22314 (sdepalma@aapa.org).

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