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The Health Physics journal has recently hosted lively discussions of two controversial topics in the radiation sciences. In the February issue, we published “World Atmospheric CO2, Its 14C Specific Activity, Non-fossil Component, Anthropogenic Fossil Component, and Emissions (1750-2018)", by Kenneth Skrable and colleagues. This paper instigated a series of Letters to the Editor with corresponding responses from the authors (see the June and July 2022 issues). I hope readers are finding this discussion as interesting as I am. Similarly, the April issue presented the Health Physics Society's comments on extravasation reporting requirements and another series of Letters to the Editor on those comments. In both of these instances, and in the case of numerous other papers we have published over the years, the Health Physics journal strives to provide a neutral forum for the collegial discussion of controversial issues of the day.

 

Now we have another opportunity to serve our readers in this capacity. The Health Physics Society recently released a 10-hour, 22-episode deep dive into The History of the Linear No-Threshold Model (https://hps.org/hpspublications/historylnt/index.html). I can't think of a more hard-fought, longer running controversy in our field than this old chestnut. I hope our readers will take advantage of the chance to pore through this free, publicly available video series, learn about the early history of our system of radiation protection, and collect 10 CHP continuing education credits as an added bonus.

 

Although this topic is a professional interest of mine, I learned a lot from this richly detailed, thoroughly documented series. No doubt, this story will stir many passions, both pro and con, and we here at the journal are here for you! I am publicly offering the Health Physics journal as a neutral venue for representatives of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Commission on Radiation Protection and Measurements, the International Commission on Radiation Protection, the International Radiation Protection Association, and individual readers to express your views. So watch the videos, read the cited supporting documents, and write those Letters to the Editor or full-length papers. Be sure to cite your sources, and please keep it professional. We welcome a robust, constructive discussion of this fundamentally important topic at the heart of radiation protection.​​



Editor's Pick:

World Atmospheric CO2, Its 14C Specific Activity, Non-fossil Component, Anthropogenic Fossil Component, and Emissions (1750–2018)​​


Published April 2022

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