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Work-related factors influencing home care nurse intent to remain employed

Tourangeau, Ann E.; Patterson, Erin; Saari, Margaret; Thomson, Heather; Cranley, Lisa

doi: 10.1097/HMR.0000000000000093
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Background: Health care is shifting out of hospitals into community settings. In Ontario, Canada, home care organizations continue to experience challenges recruiting and retaining nurses. However, factors influencing home care nurse retention that can be modified remain largely unexplored. Several groups of factors have been identified as influencing home care nurse intent to remain employed including job characteristics, work structures, relationships and communication, work environment, responses to work, and conditions of employment.

Purpose: The aim of this study was to test and refine a model that identifies which factors are related to home care nurse intentions to remain employed for the next 5 years with their current home care employer organization.

Methodology/Approach: A cross-sectional survey design was implemented to test and refine a hypothesized model of home care nurse intent to remain employed. Logistic regression was used to determine which factors influence home care nurse intent to remain employed.

Findings: Home care nurse intent to remain employed for the next 5 years was associated with increasing age, higher nurse-evaluated quality of care, having greater variety of patients, experiencing greater meaningfulness of work, having greater income stability, having greater continuity of client care, experiencing more positive relationships with supervisors, experiencing higher work–life balance, and being more satisfied with salary and benefits.

Practice Implications: Home care organizations can promote home care nurse intent to remain employed by (a) ensuring nurses have adequate training and resources to provide quality client care, (b) improving employment conditions to increase income stability and satisfaction with pay and benefits, (c) ensuring manageable workloads to facilitate improved work–life balance, and (d) ensuring leaders are accessible and competent.

Ann E. Tourangeau, RN, PhD, is Associate Professor and Associate Dean Academic, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. E-mail: ann.tourangeau@utoronto.ca.

Erin Patterson, RN, MN, is PhD Candidate, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Margaret Saari, RN, MT, is PhD Candidate, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Heather Thomson, RN, PhD, is Manager, Strategic Partnerships, Health Quality Ontario, Toronto, Canada.

Lisa Cranley, RN, PhD, is Assistant Professor, Lawrence S. Bloomberg Faculty of Nursing, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

The authors have disclosed that they have no significant relationship with, or financial interest in, any commercial companies pertaining to this article.

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