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Three Lymphadenectomy Strategies in Low-Risk Endometrial Carcinoma

A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

Suidan, Rudy S., MD, MS; Sun, Charlotte C., DrPH; Cantor, Scott B., PhD; Mariani, Andrea, MD; Soliman, Pamela T., MD, MPH; Westin, Shannon N., MD, MPH; Lu, Karen H., MD; Giordano, Sharon H., MD, MPH; Meyer, Larissa A., MD, MPH

doi: 10.1097/AOG.0000000000002677
Contents: Gynecologic Oncology: Original Research
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OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the cost-utility of three lymphadenectomy strategies in the management of low-risk endometrial carcinoma.

METHODS: A decision analysis model compared three lymphadenectomy strategies in women undergoing minimally invasive surgery for low-risk endometrial carcinoma: 1) routine lymphadenectomy in all patients, 2) selective lymphadenectomy based on intraoperative frozen section criteria, and 3) sentinel lymph node mapping. Costs and outcomes were obtained from published literature and Medicare reimbursement rates. Costs categories consisted of hospital, physician, operating room, pathology, and lymphedema treatment. Effectiveness was defined as 3-year disease-specific survival adjusted for the effect of lymphedema (utility=0.8) on quality of life. A cost-utility analysis was performed comparing the different strategies. Multiple deterministic sensitivity analyses were done.

RESULTS: In the base-case scenario, routine lymphadenectomy had a cost of $18,041 and an effectiveness of 2.79 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). Selective lymphadenectomy had a cost of $17,036 and an effectiveness of 2.81 QALYs, whereas sentinel lymph node mapping had a cost of $16,401 and an effectiveness of 2.87 QALYs. With a difference of $1,005 and 0.02 QALYs, selective lymphadenectomy was both less costly and more effective than routine lymphadenectomy, dominating it. However, with the lowest cost and highest effectiveness, sentinel lymph node mapping dominated the other modalities and was the most cost-effective strategy. These findings were robust to multiple sensitivity analyses varying the rates of lymphedema and lymphadenectomy, surgical approach (open or minimally invasive surgery), lymphedema utility, and costs. For the estimated 40,000 women undergoing surgery for low-risk endometrial carcinoma each year in the United States, the annual cost of routine lymphadenectomy, selective lymphadenectomy, and sentinel lymph node mapping would be $722 million, $681 million, and $656 million, respectively.

CONCLUSION: Compared with routine and selective lymphadenectomy, sentinel lymph node mapping had the lowest costs and highest quality-adjusted survival, making it the most cost-effective strategy in the management of low-risk endometrial carcinoma.

Sentinel lymph node mapping is the most cost-effective lymphadenectomy strategy in the management of low-risk endometrial cancer.

Division of Surgery, Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, and the Department of Health Services Research, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas; and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

Corresponding author: Larissa A. Meyer, MD, MPH, Division of Surgery, Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Reproductive Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1155 Herman Pressler, CPB 6.3271, Unit 1362, Houston, TX 77030; email: lmeyer@mdanderson.org.

Rudy S. Suidan is supported by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) T32 grant (#5T32 CA101642). Larissa A. Meyer is supported by a National Cancer Institute (NCI) K award (#K07 CA201013). Sharon H. Giordano is supported in part by a NCI MD Anderson Cancer Center Support Grant (#P30 CA016672) and a Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) grant (#RP160674). Shannon N. Westin is supported by the Andrew Sabin Family Fellowship, a NIH Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) in Uterine Cancer (#2P50 CA098258-06), and a NIH MD Anderson Cancer Center Support Grant (#P30CA016672).

Financial Disclosure Dr. Sun has received research support from AstraZeneca for unrelated research. Dr. Cantor has received research support from Intuitive Surgical and Hitachi. Dr. Soliman has received research support from Novartis and has been a consultant for Janssen Oncology. Dr. Westin has been a consultant for AstraZeneca, BioAscend, Medscape Oncology, Vaniam Group LLC, Genentech, Ovation, Vermillion, Clovis Oncology, Tesaro, and Medivation. She has received research support from AstraZeneca, Novartis, Critical Outcomes Technologies Inc, Tesaro, and Bayer. Dr. Meyer has received research support from AstraZeneca for unrelated research, and she participated in an advisory board Clovis Oncology in October of 2016. The other authors did not report any potential conflicts of interest.

Presented at the Society of Gynecologic Oncology’s Annual Meeting on Women's Cancer, National Harbor, Maryland, March 12–15, 2017; and at the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s Quality Care Symposium, Orlando, Florida, March 3–4, 2017.

Each author has indicated that he or she has met the journal's requirements for authorship.

Received January 25, 2018. Received in revised form March 23, 2018. Accepted March 29, 2018.

Historically, the standard surgical management of endometrial cancer included a routine full pelvic lymph node dissection. Because two trials have shown no survival advantage for full lymph node dissection, critics of this approach argue that it increases surgical morbidity without any appreciable diagnostic benefit and no survival gain, especially in “low-risk” disease.1–3

Although no consensus exists as to the definition of “low-risk” patients, some investigators have shown that patients with grade 1–2 endometrioid histology, tumor size 2 cm or less, and 50% or less myometrial invasion on frozen section have only a 5% chance of nodal metastasis and have concluded that lymph node dissection may be omitted in them.4,5 Critics of selective lymph node dissection based on these criteria argue against the accuracy of frozen section and that some women with advanced cancer will be inadequately staged.6 Sentinel lymph node mapping is an alternative strategy. Proponents say that it diminishes the risk of lymphedema with routine lymph node dissection and minimizes the risk of inadequately staging certain patients with selective lymph node dissection, whereas critics point out the risk of inaccurate mapping and the possibility of missing disease.3,7

As health care costs continue to rise, it is essential to scrutinize not only the benefit of different approaches, but also their costs. Prior cost-effectiveness analyses comparing routine and selective lymph node dissection have had conflicting results; however, no studies to date have assessed the cost-effectiveness of a sentinel lymph node algorithm in comparison with other management strategies.8,9 Our objective was to evaluate the cost-utility of sentinel lymph node mapping, selective lymph node dissection, and routine lymph node dissection in the management of low-risk endometrial carcinoma.

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MATERIALS AND METHODS

Low-risk endometrial carcinoma was defined as clinical stage 1 disease with grade 1–2 endometrioid histology on preoperative endometrial biopsy. A decision analysis model (Fig. 1) was constructed comparing three lymph node dissection strategies in women undergoing minimally invasive surgery for low-risk carcinoma: 1) routine lymph node dissection in all patients; 2) selective lymph node dissection based on intraoperative frozen section (Mayo Clinic criteria), in which approximately 60% of patients undergo lymph node dissection4,10; and 3) sentinel lymph node mapping based on the Memorial Sloan Kettering algorithm.7 The sentinel lymph node mapping algorithm includes the pathologic ultrastaging of sentinel lymph nodes and the performance of a side-specific pelvic lymph node dissection if no mapping occurs on a hemipelvis. Based on their most recently published data, 80% of patients map to both sides of the pelvis, 15% map unilaterally and require a contralateral side-specific lymph node dissection, and 5% do not map and require a bilateral lymph node dissection.7,11 All patients in the three arms underwent hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Minimally invasive surgery was chosen for the base-case analysis because that is the most common modality used to treat endometrial carcinoma in the United States. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center institutional review board exempted this study from approval.

Fig. 1.

Fig. 1.

The model was constructed using data from the published literature and clinical estimates. Clinical outcomes used are shown in Table 1. The rate of lymphedema after full lymph node dissection for endometrial cancer varies from 3% to 38% in the literature; thus, 20% was chosen for the base-case scenario.3,12–14 There are no published data on the risk of lymphedema with sentinel lymph node mapping; however, studies have shown that patients who had less than five lymph nodes excised had a 0–9% risk of developing it.14–16 Therefore, 5% was chosen as a conservative estimate for the sentinel lymph node mapping arm. Because not all patients who undergo sentinel lymph node map bilaterally successfully, “weighted sentinel lymph node mapping” adjusts for the fact that 15% of patients require a unilateral lymph node dissection and 5% require a bilateral lymph node dissection. The rate of lymphedema was thus estimated to be slightly higher in the sentinel lymph node arm, and “weighted sentinel lymph node” was used for all our analysis. The utility of lymphedema was considered to be 0.8 based on a large study by Cheville et al17 assessing the effect of lower extremity lymphedema on quality of life (QOL). Lymphedema was chosen as the main factor affecting QOL because it is often cited as the main complication from full lymph node dissection and can have a debilitating effect on patients when significant.14,16 Published 3-year disease-specific survival and overall survival rates were obtained from the report by Zahl Eriksson et al,18 which was a nonrandomized study comparing patients who underwent sentinel lymph node mapping and selective lymph node dissection at two institutions. In that study, patients in the sentinel lymph node mapping arm had a significant increase in 3-year disease-specific survival (100% vs 98.8%); however, there was a nonsignificant increase in overall survival (97.4% vs 95.4%). Additional operating room time needed was estimated for frozen section, lymph node dissection, and sentinel lymph node mapping.

Table 1.

Table 1.

The analysis was performed from the perspective of a third-party payer. Year 2016 Medicare reimbursement rates were used to calculate estimates of costs. Cost categories consisted of hospital, physician, operating room, pathology, and lymphedema treatment (Table 2). The hospital cost of surgery was $11,697 based on diagnosis-related group code #740. Surgeon, anesthesia, and pathology fees were obtained from the Medicare Physician Fee Schedule using relevant Current Procedural Terminology codes.19,20 Pathology costs included the cost of ultrastaging and frozen section, and “weighted sentinel lymph node mappings” was used for both surgeon and pathology fees. Additional operating room time was estimated to cost $30 per minute.21 Lymphedema treatment costs were estimated at $2,500 per year based on a previous study.8 Other long-term costs were excluded because they were considered to be equivalent in the three arms. Costs were reported in U.S. dollars and were adjusted to 2016 currency values.

Table 2.

Table 2.

A cost-utility analysis was performed comparing the different strategies. A cost-utility analysis is a cost-effectiveness analysis that takes into account cost, survival, and QOL. Effectiveness was defined as 3-year disease-specific survival adjusted for the effect of lymphedema on QOL. Disease-specific survival was used because it was an outcome that was significantly different among lymph node dissection strategies in the analysis by Zahl Eriksson et al.18 The time horizon for our analysis was considered to be 3 years. This was chosen because we based our effectiveness outcome on Zahl Eriksson et al's study, which is the only one in the literature comparing survival between sentinel lymph node mapping and selective lymph node dissection and which published 3-year survival outcomes. We planned to calculate incremental cost-effectiveness ratios. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and costs were discounted at an annual 3% rate. Multiple deterministic sensitivity analyses were performed varying the surgical approach (open vs minimally invasive surgery), effectiveness outcome (overall survival vs disease-specific survival), the rates of lymphedema and lymph node dissection, lymphedema utility, the rate of successful sentinel lymph node mapping, and costs. Analysis was done using TreeAge Pro 2016.

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RESULTS

In the base-case scenario, routine lymph node dissection had a cost of $18,041 per patient and an effectiveness of 2.79 QALYs. The cost was calculated as a summation of the following: hospital ($11,697), surgeon ($1,878), anesthesia ($592), pathology ($1,517), additional operating room time ($900), and lymphedema treatment ($1,457). Selective lymph node dissection had a cost of $17,036 per patient and an effectiveness of 2.81 QALYs, whereas sentinel lymph node mapping had a cost of $16,401 per patient and an effectiveness of 2.87 QALYs. When comparing selective with routine lymph node dissection, the selective lymph node dissection arm was both less costly ($1,005) and more effective (0.02 QALYs) than routine lymph node dissection, making it the dominant arm. However, when comparing all three strategies, the sentinel lymph node mapping arm had both the lowest cost and highest effectiveness, dominating the other modalities, and was thus the most cost-effective strategy (Table 3). No incremental cost-effectiveness ratio could be determined because the sentinel lymph node mapping arm was both less costly and more effective. For the estimated 40,000 women undergoing surgery for low-risk endometrial carcinoma each year in the United States, the annual cost would be $722 million, $681 million, and $656 million if all underwent routine lymph node dissection, selective lymph node dissection, and sentinel lymph node mapping, respectively (assuming all undergo minimally invasive surgery).

Table 3.

Table 3.

To assess the robustness of these results, we performed several sensitivity analyses adjusting different parameters. In the first sensitivity analysis, we assumed all patients underwent open surgery and used cost estimates for that as opposed to minimally invasive surgery costs (Table 4). In the second analysis, we changed the effectiveness outcome and looked at quality-adjusted 3-year overall survival instead of disease-specific survival (Table 5). Sentinel lymph node mapping remained the most cost-effective strategy in each case.

Table 4.

Table 4.

Table 5.

Table 5.

We also performed multiple other deterministic sensitivity analyses on selected variables in the model across the ranges specified in Tables 1 and 2. We varied the risk of lymphedema in different lymph node strategies, lymphedema utility, the rate of lymph node dissection in the selective lymph node dissection arm, successful sentinel lymph node mapping rates, survival estimates, additional operating room time needed, and costs. For example, in one analysis, we assumed that the risk of lymphedema was 10%, 0%, and 0% for patients with routine lymph node dissection, sentinel lymph node mapping, and no lymph node dissection, respectively, which affected the total lymphedema treatment costs in each arm. In this scenario, sentinel lymph node mapping was still the least costly at $15,895 per patient vs $16,599 per patient for selective lymph node dissection and $17,312 per patient for routine lymph node dissection. With sentinel lymph node mapping having the highest effectiveness, it remained the dominant strategy.

In another analysis, we changed several variables simultaneously: we assumed different lymphedema risks (30%, 10%, and 5% for routine lymph node dissection, sentinel lymph node mapping, and no lymph node dissection, respectively), increased the lymphedema utility to 0.95, estimated that 50% of women in the selective lymph node dissection arm undergo lymph node dissection, increased additional operating room time needed (60 minutes for lymph node dissection, 30 minutes for sentinel lymph node mapping, and 25 minutes for frozen section), and assumed equivalent 3-year disease-specific survival for all three arms (95%). Routine lymph node dissection thus had a cost of $19,699 per patient and an effectiveness of 2.72 QALYs. Selective lymph node dissection had a cost of $17,757 per patient and an effectiveness of 2.74 QALYs, whereas sentinel lymph node mapping had a cost of $16,998 per patient and an effectiveness of 2.75 QALYs. In this analysis and other ones using different estimates for various parameters, sentinel lymph node mapping remained the most cost-effective approach.

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DISCUSSION

In this cost-utility analysis, selective lymph node dissection was more cost-effective than routine lymph node dissection in patients undergoing surgery for low-risk endometrial carcinoma. However, compared with routine and selective lymph node dissection, sentinel lymph node mapping had the lowest costs and highest quality-adjusted survival, making it the most cost-effective strategy.

There is debate regarding the optimal approach to lymph node dissection in endometrial cancer. Although routine lymph node dissection was traditionally considered standard of care, some investigators have proposed a selective lymph node dissection approach after identifying a cohort of patients for whom lymph node dissection could be omitted.2,22 Others have advocated a sentinel lymph node mapping strategy, arguing that it decreases the risk of understaging some patients with selective lymph node dissection while minimizing the risk of lymphedema with routine lymph node dissection.3 A prospective study has suggested that sentinel lymph node mapping has a high degree of diagnostic accuracy in detecting metastasis and can safely replace routine lymph node dissection.23 Zahl Eriksson et al concluded that either selective lymph node dissection or sentinel lymph node mapping was acceptable for staging with no apparent detriment to the use of a sentinel lymph node algorithm.18

There are several reasons why the sentinel lymph node mapping strategy was most cost-effective. First, when looking at effectiveness, sentinel lymph node mapping was associated with improved 3-year disease-specific survival when compared with selective lymph node dissection.18 When adjusting for the effect of lymphedema on QOL, the difference became even more pronounced, because sentinel lymph node mapping theoretically leads to less lymphedema than both selective and routine lymph node dissection.17,24 With regard to costs, routine lymph node dissection had the highest costs as a result of having the highest surgeon ($1,878), pathology ($1,517), and lymphedema treatment ($1,457) costs. Compared with selective lymph node dissection, sentinel lymph node mapping had slightly higher surgeon ($1,621 vs $1,493) and pathology ($1,340 vs $1,240) fees, but significantly less operating room time ($645 vs $1,140) and lymphedema treatment ($506 vs $874) costs, making it the least costly arm. The selective lymph node dissection arm had the longest operating room time given the need for frozen section on all cases and lymph node dissection on 60% of the patients. If the time horizon of our study was longer than 3 years, it is possible the cost differences would be even more pronounced when accounting for lymphedema treatment.

Our study has several limitations. Costs were based on Medicare reimbursement rates, which may or may not reflect commercial insurance reimbursement or the cost of delivering care from a hospital or health care provider perspective.19 Although published data were used for most parameters, clinical assumptions were made when data were unavailable. Indeed, our biggest assumption was that sentinel lymph node mapping is associated with a decreased risk of lymphedema compared with lymph node dissection. Although there are no data to support this, we based our assumption on several studies showing that having less than five lymph nodes excised was associated with a much smaller risk of developing lymphedema.13–16 Additionally, when looking at effectiveness, the QALY difference among the different lymph node dissection arms was small. This can be attributed to the fact that our time horizon was 3 years and that most patients with low-risk cancer tend to have good clinical outcomes. The 3-year limit was chosen because we based our effectiveness outcome on Zahl Eriksson et al's study, which was the only one in the literature comparing survival between sentinel lymph node mapping and selective lymph node dissection and which used 3-year survival outcomes.18 This can also be considered a limitation, because the conclusions regarding effectiveness were based on that study's reported survivals. Future studies that report survival may enhance or diminish our conclusions; therefore, they should be interpreted with caution until validated. Additionally, we did not account for the effect of adjuvant pelvic radiation therapy on costs or QOL.

The major strength of our study lies in the fact that we compared all three lymph node dissection strategies currently in practice in this population, and we assessed the cost-effectiveness of sentinel lymph node mapping in this setting. In addition, our effectiveness outcome was based on published survival data and quality-adjusted for the effect of lymphedema. Indeed, previous analyses comparing routine and selective lymph node dissection were cost-effectiveness analyses, whereas ours was a cost-utility study, which is a cost-effectiveness analysis that takes QOL into account.8,9 In addition, our findings were robust to multiple sensitivity analyses, which further support our results.

In conclusion, our study showed that sentinel lymph node mapping was the most cost-effective strategy in the upfront surgical management of low-risk endometrial carcinoma (clinical stage 1 disease with grade 1–2 endometrioid histology). This adds to the body of literature evaluating the clinical benefits of this strategy and may help health care providers in the decision-making process as they consider which approach to use. Continued research into the costs and effectiveness of different lymph node dissection strategies is needed.

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REFERENCES

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© 2018 by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.