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Committee Opinion Summary No. 641

Human Papillomavirus Vaccination

doi: 10.1097/01.AOG.0000471169.97100.9d
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ABSTRACT: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with the development of anogenital cancer (including cervical, vaginal, vulvar, penile, and anal), oropharyngeal cancer, and genital warts. Human papillomavirus vaccination can significantly reduce the incidence of anogenital cancer and genital warts. Despite the benefits of HPV vaccines, only approximately one third of girls in the recommended age group have received all three vaccines. Compared with other vaccines recommended in the same age bracket, HPV vaccination rates in the United States are unacceptably low. It is crucial that obstetrician–gynecologists and other providers educate parents and patients on the benefits and safety of HPV vaccination. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommend routine vaccination with HPV vaccine for girls and boys. The 9-valent HPV vaccine is recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and was licensed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in December 2014 for girls and boys aged 11–12 years.

For a comprehensive overview of these recommendations, the full-text version of this Committee Opinion is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000001052.

Committee on Adolescent Health Care

Immunization Expert Work Group

This Committee Opinion reflects emerging clinical and scientific advances as of the date issued and is subject to change. This information should not be construed as dictating an exclusive course of treatment or procedure to be followed.

Copyright September 2015 by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 409 12th Street, SW, PO Box 96920, Washington, DC 20090-6920. All rights reserved.

Official Citation Human papillomavirus vaccination. Committee Opinion No. 641. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Obstet Gynecol 2015;126:e38–43.

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Recommendations

  • It is crucial that obstetrician–gynecologists and other providers educate parents and patients on the benefits and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (the College) recommend routine vaccination with HPV vaccine for girls and boys. Despite this recommendation, only approximately 50% of girls aged 13–17 years in the United States have received at least one vaccine dose; only 33% have received all three doses.
  • The target age for vaccination is 11–12 years for girls and boys.
  • The 9-valent HPV vaccine has been added to the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations for girls and boys at the target age of 11–12 years with catch-up for females and males through age 26 years if not vaccinated in the target age.
  • Testing for HPV DNA is not recommended before vaccination in any group and if the patient is tested for HPV DNA and the results are positive, vaccination is still recommended.
© 2015 by The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.