Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

BLANCO JORGE D. MD; GIBBS, RONALD S. MD; CASTANEDA, YOLANDA S. RN
Obstetrics & Gynecology: November 1981
Original Article: PDF Only
Free

The authors reviewed all documented cases of bacteremia in obstetric patients between 1975 and 1979, with emphasis on the clinical course. The incidence of bacteremia was 7.5:1000 obstetric admissions and 9.7% of those patients sampled. One hundred seventy-six bacteremic obstetric patients had the following diagnoses: endoparametritis (123), pyelonephritis (29), chorioamnionitis (14), and other (10). No deaths, clinical evidence of septic shock, or cases of postinfection endocarditis were found. The most common bloodstream isolates were Escherichia coli (57), group B streptococcus (28), and Bacteroides sp (26). The patients with endoparametritis had a fever index of 86.2 ± 47.1Fhours, an average hospital stay of 6.5 ± 3.1 days, a 7.3% rate of complications, and a 19.5% rate of failure of primary antibiotics. The patients with chorioamnionitis had a fever index of 32.7 ± 48.9F-hours and an average hospital stay of 4.8 ± 2.3 days. These clinical measures are comparable with those in the general population with the same diagnoses at the authors' hospital. In this obstetric population, prompt, vigorous treatment rendered the clinical course of bacteremic patients with genital infections remarkably similar to that of nonbacteremic patients with the same kinds of infection.

© 1981 The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists