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Further Observations on Placental Transfusion

PHILIP ALISTAIR G. S. MB MRCP(E)
Obstetrics & Gynecology: September 1973
Original Article: PDF Only

Fifty-seven infants were studied for the effects of allowing or preventing placental transfusion with cord clamping (defined in respect to onset of respirations). The mean residual placental blood volumes were 103 ml in the early-clamping group, and 45 ml in the delayed-clamping group. The differences in hematocrit on first, third and fifth day samples were significant. The difference in mean hematocrits correlated well with the difference in mean residual placental blood volumes per kg. This simple “noninvasive” technic provides further evidence of the role of onset of respirations in effecting placental transfusion. It is suggested that infants born to diabetic mothers may not be at great risk of overtransfusion; and that despite the changes in hematocrit, there is little difference between the two groups with respect to bilirubin, haptoglobin, reticulocyte levels, or to intake and output of fluid.

© 1973 The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists