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Smaller-incision Revision of Trabeculectomy With Mitomycin

Long-term Outcomes and Complications

Chen, Philip P., MD; Moeller, Kristy L., MD

doi: 10.1097/IJG.0000000000001129
Original Studies

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess long-term outcomes and complications of smaller-incision trabeculectomy revision with mitomycin (MMC) in glaucoma patients.

Methods: Review of patients undergoing trabeculectomy revision with MMC for inadequate intraocular pressure (IOP) control. After dissection of subconjunctival fibrosis through a smaller (median, 5 mm) incision, MMC was topically applied and episcleral fibrosis was incised. Failure was defined as reoperation for glaucoma, or IOP reduction < 20% over 3 follow up visits.

Results: Forty eyes (40 patients; mean age, 67±13 y) underwent revision; 9 revisions were combined with other surgery. Mean baseline IOP was 20.6±6.2 mm Hg on 2.6±1.4 glaucoma medications after 2.4±1.3 incisional ocular surgeries. At final follow-up (70±34 mo), 27 successful eyes (67.5%) had IOP of 9.2±2.4 mm Hg on 0.6±0.9 medications. Eleven eyes (27.5%) required reoperation for glaucoma, 7 (63%) within 7 months after revision. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of success at years 1, 2, 3, and 5 postoperatively was 77.5%, 72.2%, 69.5%, and 69.5%, respectively. Recovery of visual acuity to within 2 lines of baseline was 1.7±2.4 weeks (median 1). Complications included sustained hypotony (IOP, ≤5 mm Hg) in 2 eyes (1 also with corneal decompensation), 1 eye with wound leak, and 2 eyes with bleb leak (1 requiring surgical repair).

Conclusions: Smaller-incision trabeculectomy revision with MMC resulted in substantial, sustained IOP reduction in most eyes with poorly functioning filtering blebs, with few serious complications and rapid recovery of baseline visual acuity in most eyes.

Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Supported in part by a Departmental Grant from Research to Prevent Blindness, New York, NY.

Disclosure: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

Reprints: Philip P. Chen, MD, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington, 325 Ninth Avenue, Box 359608, Seattle, WA 98104-2499 (e-mail: pchen@uw.edu).

Received August 6, 2018

Accepted October 17, 2018

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