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High Prevalence of Anxiety and Depression in Patients With Primary Open-angle Glaucoma

Mabuchi, Fumihiko MD, PhD*; Yoshimura, Kimio MD, PhD; Kashiwagi, Kenji MD, PhD*; Shioe, Kunihiko MD, PhD; Yamagata, Zentaro MD, PhD§; Kanba, Shigenobu MD, PhD; Iijima, Hiroyuki MD, PhD*; Tsukahara, Shigeo MD, PhD*

doi: 10.1097/IJG.0b013e31816299d4
Original Studies

Purpose To assess anxiety and depression in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG).

Design Multicenter prospective case-control study.

Participants Two hundred thirty patients with POAG and 230 sex-matched and age-matched reference subjects with no chronic ocular conditions except cataracts.

Intervention Anxiety and depression were evaluated using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) questionnaire, which consists of 2 subscales with ranges of 0 to 21, representing anxiety (HADS-A) and depression (HADS-D).

Main Outcome Measure The prevalence of POAG patients with anxiety (a score of more than 10 on the HADS-A) or depression (a score of more than 10 on the HADS-D) was compared with that in the reference subjects. The prevalence of patients with depression was compared between the POAG patients with and without current β-blocker eye drops.

Results The prevalence (13.0%) of POAG patients with anxiety was significantly higher (P=0.030) than in the reference subjects (7.0%). The prevalence (10.9%) of POAG patients with depression was significantly higher (P=0.026) than in the reference subjects (5.2%). Between the POAG patients with and without β-blocker eye-drops, no significant difference (P=0.93) in the prevalence of depression was noted.

Conclusions POAG was related to anxiety and depression. No significant relationship between the use of β-blocker eye-drops and depression was noted.

Departments of *Ophthalmology

Neuropsychiatry

§Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi

Cancer Information and Epidemiology Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo

Department of Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan

Funding: None.

Competing Interests: None.

Reprints: Dr Fumihiko Mabuchi, MD, PhD, Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Yamanashi, 1110 Shimokato, Chuo, Yamanashi 409-3898, Japan (e-mail: fmabuchi@yamanashi.ac.jp).

Received for publication August 1, 2007; accepted November 18, 2007

© 2008 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.