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Home Food Environment Factors Associated With Hispanic Preschoolers' Intake of Fruits and Vegetables

Lora, Karina R. PhD, RD; Branscum, Paul W. PhD, RD; Chen, Sixia PhD; Wakefield, Dorothy MS

doi: 10.1097/FCH.0000000000000235
Original Articles
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The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of home fruit and vegetable (F&V) availability and maternal feeding practices with Hispanic preschoolers' F&V intake (N = 238). “Availability' of total fruit” (P < .0001) and “modeling” (P < .020) increased the odds of consuming 1 or more cups of fruit. “Pressure” (P < .009) and the child being female (P < .028) increased the odds of consuming 1 or more cups of vegetables, while having a greater number of children in the home (P < .037) reduced the odds of consuming 1 or more cups of vegetables. To increase preschoolers' intake of F&V, interventions should target specific environmental factors in the home and maternal monitoring practices.

Department of Exercise and Nutrition Science, The George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia (Dr Lora); Department of Kinesiology and Health, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio (Dr Branscum); Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City (Dr Chen); and Center of Aging, University of Connecticut Health, Farmington (Ms Wakefield).

Correspondence: Karina R. Lora, PhD, RD, Department of Exercise and Nutrition Science, The George Washington University, 950 New Hampshire Ave, Washington, DC 20052 (klora@gwu.edu).

Funding for this study was supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award no. U54GM104938 to the Oklahoma Shared Clinical and Translational Resources (Dr Lora pilot project awardee). The authors are thankful to the study participants, students who assisted with data collection, and community organizations for their support with participants' recruitment. The study sponsor did not have a role in the study design, collection and analysis of data, interpretation of findings, or manuscript writing.

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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