Private Drinking Water Wells as a Source of Exposure to Perfluorooctanoic Acid in Communities Surrounding a Washington, West Virginia Fluoropolymer Production Facility : Epidemiology

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Abstracts: ISEE 22nd Annual Conference, Seoul, Korea, 28 August–1 September 2010: Exposure Assessment by Various Media and Pathways

Private Drinking Water Wells as a Source of Exposure to Perfluorooctanoic Acid in Communities Surrounding a Washington, West Virginia Fluoropolymer Production Facility

Hoffman, Kate1; Webster, Thomas1; Bartell, Scott2; Weisskopf, Marc3; Fletcher, Tony4; Vieira, Verónica1

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Epidemiology 22(1):p S85-S86, January 2011. | DOI: 10.1097/01.ede.0000391926.69693.ca
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O-30B6-4

Background/Aims:

The C8 Health Project was established in 2005 to collect data on perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, or C8) and human health in Ohio and West Virginia communities contaminated by a fluoropolymer production facility. This study assesses PFOA exposure via contaminated drinking water in a subset of C8 Health Project participants, using private drinking water wells.

Methods:

Participants provided demographic information, and residential, occupational, and medical histories. Laboratory analyses were conducted to determine serum PFOA concentrations. PFOA monitoring data was collected from 2001 to 2005 in 62 private drinking water wells. We examined the relationship between drinking water and serum PFOA levels using robust regression methods. As a comparison, we used 2 first-order, single compartment pharmacokinetic models to estimate the serum to drinking water concentration ratio: a steady-state model assuming well water PFOA concentrations were constant, and a nonsteady-state model accounting for PFOA variability over time.

Results:

The median serum PFOA concentration in 108 study participants using private wells was 75.7 μg/L, approximately 20 times greater than the US general population levels, but similar to local residents drinking public water. Each μg/L increase in drinking water PFOA increased serum concentrations by 138.7 μg/L (95% confidence interval: 132.2–145.3). The serum to drinking water concentration ratio for the steady-state pharmacokinetic model was 113.9. Nonsteady-state predictions were similar because water PFOA concentrations were relatively stable over time.

Conclusion:

PFOA contaminated drinking water is a significant contributor to serum levels in this population. Regression methods and pharmacokinetic modeling produced similar estimates of the relationship.

© 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.