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Technology & Inventions

This blog focuses on the latest products, devices, and ideas to improve emergency medicine practice. Brief news releases and photographs are welcome, and must be submitted electronically. Images must be 300 dpi, in tiff, jpeg, or eps format, and at least 4“x4” in size. Please send information to emn@lww.com.

Friday, September 7, 2012

New Technology & Inventions
By Matthew Coleman
 
This column focuses on the latest products, devices, and ideas to improve emergency medicine practice. Brief news releases and photographs are welcome, and must be submitted electronically. Images must be 300 dpi, in tiff, jpeg, or eps format, and at least 4“x4” in size. Please send information to emn@lww.com.

Portable Brain Cooler
 
 
Cooling the brain after cardiac arrest has been known to improve neurological outcomes in patients, and initiating this process as early as possible is essential. The RhinoChill Intra-Nasal Cooling System allows cooling to start in the field by using a noninvasive nasal catheter that sprays a rapidly evaporating coolant liquid into the nasal cavity. The system is small, battery-powered, easy to use, and portable, allowing for quick deployment in any prehospital and emergency setting. It also won the Critical Care and Emergency Medicine Product of the Year prize in the 2012 MEDTEC EMDT Innovation Awards. Visit www.benechill.com/wp/rhinochill-trade for details.
 
Innovative Wound Dressing
 
 
Patients with partial thickness burns must undergo painful dressing changes as frequently as twice daily, which can cause discomfort and potential wound infection. ConvaTec’s Aquacel Ag burn dressing can be left on for up to 21 days. The dressing features the company’s hydrofiber technology, which has been shown to lock in fluid and trap bacteria. It incorporates the antimicrobial action of silver, proven to kill a broad spectrum of pathogens, including MRSA, VRE, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida krusei, and Bacteroides fragilis. The Aquacel Ag burn dressings also come as a glove for partial thickness burns to hands, where a large number of burn injuries occur. More information is available at www.convatec.com.
 
C. difficile Prevention
 
 
The spread of Clostridium difficile, the bacteria that causes diarrhea and other health issues, has become a tremendous health concern in medical facilities. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that the rate of infection increased by 400 percent from 2000 to 2007. Most infections spread in hospitals through fecal contamination, making appropriate management important. ConvaTec’s Flexi-Seal fecal management system provides such a system. Two in-vitro assessments of Flexi-Seal devices demonstrated that the solution prevents leakage associated with the spread of C. difficile. Visit www.convatec.com for details.
 
Connecting with Triage App
 
The iTriage app provides users with free access to medical answers and suggests where to go for treatment. It can notify hospitals of patients’ intent to visit prior to arrival, allowing them to prepare for their care based on symptoms. Participating hospitals can also list current waiting times, information about the facility, available services, and directions, all on a mobile device. Patients enter information on a customizable patient intake form prior to notifying the hospital. Visit www.tsystem.com for more information regarding emergency department connectivity.
 
Easier EMRs
 
 
Many electronic medical record programs have numerous templates that can make use difficult and confusing. Chart ED, an electronic charting program designed for emergency departments and urgent care centers, created a single-template model comprised of nine forms that use click boxes, text phrases, drop-down menus, free text, and enhanced progress notes. The product features brief training videos on the website. Details are available at www.chart-ed.com.