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PhotographED

This blog serves as a bulletin board for emergency physicians to share unusual and interesting photos of life in the ED. It is also a partner with our Instagram account, @em_news, where you can find these photos on the go.

Have a clinical photo to share? Make sure it meets these criteria:
    • You must have taken the photo yourself. No “borrowing” from someone else or another website.
    • You must have written permission to submit someone else's photo. Send us the photographer’s name so we can give credit.
    • Sending a photo of a patient? You need his written permission to take the photo, and must send a copy of it to us.
    • Be sure to obscure the patient’s face and identifying details even if you have permission (HIPAA, you know).
    • Send us the particulars about your photo: the patient’s symptoms, history, tests performed, therapies started, disposition, and outcome.
Send your entries to emn@lww.com.

Tuesday, January 22, 2019

There is little need to have a framework to consider a mid-face fracture, but being prepared with a mental schema is a good backup, especially in complex cases, says Dr. Loice Swisher. (http://bit.ly/2Tr3D2f.)

LTB-jan midface fracture.jpg


Thursday, January 17, 2019

Dr. Loice Swisher says an unwavering stepwise approach with every x-ray series may help you identify unusual injuries that could have dire and long-lasting consequences like in this case. (http://bit.ly/EMN-Lions-and-Tigers-and-Bears.)

LTB xray series 2.jpg

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

A 31-year-old man with a history of high blood pressure presents with a cold for two weeks, dizziness, and shortness of breath. What’s the diagnosis? (http://bit.ly/2ToXtPR.)

consult-acute myocarditis.jpg

Tuesday, January 15, 2019

Central retinal artery occlusion is linked to not only an increased risk of ischemic stroke but also a high rate of myocardial infarction and even death. (http://bit.ly/2Tqd8yE.)

clinical pearl-CRAO.jpg

Monday, January 14, 2019

Orbital and preseptal cellulitis have significantly overlapping signs and symptoms, but diagnosis and treatment for them are completely different, says Dr. Larry Mellick. (http://bit.ly/EMN-Mellick.)

mellick-cellulitis 1.jpg