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DOC APPROVED: Tracking CME the Easy Way

Mohseni, Alex MD

doi: 10.1097/01.EEM.0000484523.46762.0b
DOC APPROVED

Dr. Mohseniis an emergency physician in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area and the chief innovation officer of Emergency Medicine Associates. He is the editor of his own blog, http://CreativeHealthLabs.com. Follow him on Twitter @amohseni, and read his past columns athttp://emn.online/DocApprovedEMN.

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The site I review this month is a special one not only was it built by yours truly, but because I will use it to teach other physicians how to build online services and businesses.

There comes a time in some people's lives when something in the world nags at them so deeply that they decide to fix it themselves. I had this feeling recently with how we manage our CME credits. Those who shove their CME credits into a folder at home are left with a constant nagging doubt about their status. “Do I have enough? How many credits did I earn this year?” And then there's the rest of us who keep our credits in an email folder and just hope that we have enough. Almost none of my colleagues uses the online services, which require you to create yet another account and spend an afternoon manually uploading your credits.

So, I built www.cmelog.org, a free and simple service with a solitary mission: to make managing your CME as simple as possible. All core functions can be done through email: Simply forward each CME certificate separately to cme@cmelog.org with the number of credits in the subject line, and the service automatically does the rest for you. No need to register or create an account, either. The first time you send an email, your email address will be extracted to create your account. Need your balance or log for this year? Just email cme@cmelog.org with “balance” or “log” in the subject line, and you will receive your response automatically within 15 minutes.

What I am even more excited about is teaching other physicians how to build applications with minimal (if any) programming. I will be hosting a public web lecture on the guts of cmelog.org and how I built it. Please check out the website for further details, and happy learning!

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