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Technology & Inventions

Technology & Inventions
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Integrated Digital Paper and Pen Technology

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Ibex's new digital pen and paper technology works with its PulseCheck emergency department information system, allowing ease of use for clinicians more comfortable with pen and paper, according to the company. The system allows patient information to be automatically entered into an electronic medical record as the digital pen writes on ordinary paper that has been printed with digital dots. As the patient encounter is charted on paper, the content of the writing is captured digitally. The pen is then placed in a cradle that transfers the data into PulseCheck.

The technology is portable, and even if the battery in the pen is low, it still captures the data, Ibex said. The PulseCheck system is a patient tracking system from triage to disposition that can be integrated with other hospital information systems. For more information, contact Ibex at www.ibexhealthdata.com.

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Dry Erase Notes Provide Simple Alert

Magnetic Dry Erase Notes from Carstens, Inc., can be written on with a dry erase marker, cleaned off, and reused, and they adhere to any metal surface. The 2?” square magnets are available in six colors — black, blue, green, red, white, and yellow — and come in packages of 10 magnets of the same color. For more information about Carstens' Magnetic Dry Erase Notes, visit carstens.com.

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Technology & Inventions

This is Technology & Inventions, EMN's new quarterly column focusing on the latest in products, devices, and ideas to make emergency medicine practice better for patients.

Brief news releases and photographs for Technology & Inventions are welcome. Electronic submissions are preferred. They must be 300 dpi and in tiff, jpeg, or eps format. Photos or art submitted in PowerPoint, Word, or Excel cannot be accepted.

All information for the next column must be received no later than Nov. 10. Please send information to Emergency Medicine News, 333 Seventh Ave., 19th Fl., New York, NY 10001; emn@lww.com.

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Kits Allow Health Care Providers to Protect Themselves Quickly

StatPaq protection kits for health care providers and first responders from DQE are individually wrapped kits containing a barrier protective gown, protective eyewear, goggles, and N95 filter mask for grab-and-go convenience. The StatPaq protection kits are designed for use in all aspects of hospital procedures where protection from blood-borne or airborne pathogens is required.

StatPaq protection kits are available in a wall dispenser, and can be placed throughout a hospital for easy accessibility. More information about the kits can be found at www.dqeready.com.

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Remote Chart Access Links Hospitals, Physicians

HealthMatics ED Remote Chart Access provides secure access via the web to electronic medical records produced within the HealthMatics ED Information System, according to the company. Remote Chart Access helps provide follow-up care for primary care physicians after an ED visit, HealthMatics reports, and the system also allows floor nurses to gain access to the ED chart without logging into the system.

To safeguard access to important patient health information, the system sets boundaries by associating a user with a referring physician and granting view-only access to the chart by associating a referral caregiver with the patient through the standard HealthMatics ED documentation process. Remote Chart Access allows users to look up patients by name, list available charts on a selected patient, and display and print a chart. For more information, visit www.a4healthsystems.com.

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ECG with Heart Sounds Analysis

Patients presenting to the emergency department with chest pain and shortness of breath are diagnostically challenging, says Audicor, whose CE Cardiograph Expansion System works with hospital cardiographs in the first 10 minutes to report S3 and S4 heart sounds. Two sensors attach to the patient via the V3/V4 leads, and results are presented in text, waveforms, and full-color graphics via the COR Report, shown here. The system supports ACC/AHA guidelines. For more information, visit www.audicor.com.

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Nebulizer Treats Patients with Asthma

DHD Healthcare's Flo-Mist is a refillable continuous medication nebulizer for treating ED patients with severe asthma. It delivers 3 to 5 micron respirable particles directly to patients for deep inhalation, and can be used uninterrupted for up to eight hours. Flo-Mist also allows for the addition of an auxiliary flow of heliox, oxygen, or air without affecting medication output, eliminating the need for complicated dosage recalculations and allowing therapists to change the inspired flow or gas concentration, not the patient drug dosage.

Each kit includes the nebulizer, 22 mm corrugated collapsible tubing, a dosage chart, and a mask. The non-rebreathing kits also include a valved Y piece and reservoir bag. For details, visit www.dhd.com.

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Scheduling Simplified with Web Provider Access

Health care organizations that use a new web solution can save time by allowing physicians to schedule hospital cases remotely, according to its manufacturer Per-Se Technologies. Gundersen Lutheran Medical Center of La Crosse, WI; Good Samaritan Hospital of Vincennes, IN; and Henry County Memorial Hospital of New Castle, IN, participated in deploying the new software, Web Provider Access for ORSOS One-Call. According to Per-Se, the three hospitals reported improved workflow for provider's offices and hospital scheduling departments and enhanced provider, patient, and employee satisfaction.

Web Provider Access is integrated with the ORSOS One-Call enterprise-wide patient scheduling and resource management solution. For more information about One-Call, visit per-se.com.

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New Concept in Oral Intubation

The Grandview Blade was designed by emergency physician Cory Schneider, MD, and combines aspects of straight and curved blades to make intubating easier, according to its manufacturer, Hartwell Medical. The blade is 80 percent wider, which gives a better view of landmarks and makes controlling the tongue easier. It has a slight curvature to conform to the airway, but still allows the operator to see the tip for proper positioning. The width is tapered toward the tip so it will not be too wide at the laryngeal level but wide where it's needed, in the mouth. The blade also uses a patented lamp for making the view even better, the company said.

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The manufacturer also recommends using a slightly different technique than that usually taught with intubation blades. The clinician inserts the Grandview blade down the middle of the mouth on top of the tongue (similar to a tongue depressor) until the blade reaches the pharynx. Then he lifts up gently and advances the blade slowly, while watching the tip, until it reaches the vallecula, and the epiglottis is visualized. The the blade is lifted straight up while attempting to elevate the epiglottis, and the cords may be visible. A pediatric version is available, and a fiberoptic model is in development. For additional information on this new laryngoscope blade, visit www.HartwellMedical.com.

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EMR ‘Knows How EPs Think’

Developed over the past 22 years by a small group of emergency physicians in Jacksonville, FL, X-Press Enterprise EMR is a new electronic medical records system designed specifically for emergency physicians. The system is designed to work from a portable tablet or a desktop, depending on the physician's preference.

The touch-screen charts are easily readable, the company said, and the medical templates that support it are based on standard medical knowledge structured so that all elements for diagramming and billing are present and synchronized. X-Press's interface, documents, and particularly its templates, have been in continuous evolution for more than 15 years, according to X-Press Technologies. Additional information is available from X-Press Technologies at xpress@gmail.com.

© 2004 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.