Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Effect of Stimulus and Number of Sweeps on the Neonate Auditory Brainstem Response

Stuart, Andrew; Cobb, Kensi M.

doi: 10.1097/AUD.0000000000000066
Brief Reports
Buy

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to compare auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) to chirp and click stimuli in neonates at a low level typically used in newborn hearing screening. It was hypothesized that ABR wave V amplitudes would be larger and would be obtained with fewer number of stimulus presentations with chirps.

Design: Twenty-three neonates participated. ABRs were obtained to CE-Chirp and click stimuli presented at 30 dB nHL with sweeps increasing exponentially in number (i.e., 116, 232, 464, 928, and 1856).

Results: ABRs to the CE-Chirps appeared before and with greater propensity at lower sweep numbers compared to clicks. All neonates had ABRs to CE-Chirps at 464 sweeps compared to 1856 sweeps with the click stimulus. ABRs to CE-Chirps evidenced significantly larger Wave V amplitudes and significantly longer wave V latencies versus clicks.

Conclusions: Evoking ABRs in neonates to chirps could significantly improve response amplitudes and reduce test time.

Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were obtained from 23 neonates to CE-Chirp and click stimuli presented at 30 dB nHL with sweeps increasing exponentially in number (i.e., 116, 232, 464, 928, and 1856). ABRs to CE-Chirps appeared before and with greater propensity at lower sweep numbers compared to clicks. CE-Chirp wave V amplitudes and latencies were significantly larger and longer compared to clicks. ABRs evoked to chirps could significantly improve response amplitude and reduce test time with neonates.

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina, USA.

Grason-Stadler (Eden Prairie, MN) loaned the evoked potential system used in this study.

The authors declare no other conflict of interest.

Received December 19, 2013; accepted April 8, 2014.

Address for correspondence: Andrew Stuart, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Health Sciences Building, East Carolina University, Mail Stop 668, Greenville, NC 27858, USA. E-mail: stuarta@ecu.edu.

© 2014 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins