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Textile and Shoe Allergic Contact Dermatitis in Military Personnel

Slodownik, Dan, MD*†; Reiss, Amit, MD; Mashiach, Yaakov, MD; Ingber, Arieh, MD; Sprecher, Eli, MD, PhD; Moshe, Shlomo, MD†¶

doi: 10.1097/DER.0000000000000390
STUDIES

Background and Objectives Allergic contact dermatitis is a common dermatosis among military personnel. Given the unique military demands, it is not surprising that shoe dermatitis and textile dermatitis are common. Our study aimed to compare the clinical and demographic parameters between military personnel and civilians evaluated for the suspicion of shoe and textile dermatitis in a tertiary clinic in Israel.

Methods This retrospective cross-sectional study included 295 patients who were referred to a tertiary clinic for evaluation because of suspected shoe or textile dermatitis. Eighty-eight of the patients were soldiers. The patch tests were tailored according to the clinical presentation and relevant exposures.

Results The 2 populations differed in several parameters. The duration of the dermatitis was longer in the civilian group. The atopy rate was significantly higher among military conscripts. The patch test reactivity and multiple patch test reactivity were lower in the army group. Dermatitis seen in the military group tended to be more widely distributed.

Conclusions Distinctive demographic and exposure patterns explain the differences observed between the 2 study groups. It is not surprising that irritant dermatitis is more common among military personnel, given the extreme military demands and higher atopy rate among soldiers.

From the *Department of Dermatology, Tel Aviv Souraski Medical Center;

Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Tel Aviv University;

Medical Corps, Israel Defense Forces;

§Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University;

Department of Dermatology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem; and

Maccabi Healthcare Services, Jerusalem and Hashfela District, The Occupational Clinic, Holon, Israel.

Address reprint requests to Dan Slodownik, MD, Department of Dermatology, Tel Aviv Souraski Medical Center, 6 Weitzman St, Tel Aviv 6423906, Israel. E-mail: dans@tlvmc.gov.il.

The authors have no funding or conflicts of interest to declare.

© 2018 American Contact Dermatitis Society
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