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Impacts of Treatment Modalities on Physical Activity After First Acute Myocardial Infarction in Jordan

Shajrawi, Abedalmajeed PhD, MSN, RN; Al-Smadi, Ahmed Mohammad PhD, MSN, RN; Al-Shawabkeh, Ghadeer Khaled MD; Aljribeea, Hanadi Saleh MSN, BSN; Khalil, Heba PhD, RN

doi: 10.1097/DCC.0000000000000382
Clinical DIMENSION
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Background Promoting physical activity is a priority after coronary revascularisation for effective long-term cardiovascular care and to avoid further disease progression and complications. But little is known about the effect of different types of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) treatment modalities in changes in physical activity level post-AMI.

Objective This study aimed to examine changes in physical activity among patients treated with different treatment modalities post–first AMI during early recovery phase at week 2 (time 1) and week 6 (Time 2) after hospitalization.

Methods A descriptive study was done using a repeated-measures design. Physical activity was measured by a body-worn activity monitor (activPAL3 monitor) for 24 hours a day for full 7 consecutive days at time 1 and time 2 after hospitalization. Demographic and clinical data were collected from patients' records. The study was conducted in 1 setting in Jordan. Participants were met at time 1 and time 2. The study recruited a convenience sample of 94 patients with AMI. Participants did not have access to cardiac rehabilitation. The participants were categorized according to type of AMI treatment modalities into 3 groups: ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated by primary percutaneous coronary intervention, ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated by thrombolytic therapy, and non–ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated by medication.

Results Patients treated by primary percutaneous coronary intervention had a statistically significant effect on changes in mean steps count and mean stepping time per day better than patients treated by other treatment modalities between weeks 2 and 6 after hospitalization.

Conclusion The study showed that patients treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention had better mean steps count and mean stepping time per day between weeks 2 and 6 after hospitalization in comparison with other treatment modalities. These findings could be used for development of effective intervention in the future. Further research using different research methods such as longitudinal studies among different cultures to confirm the finding of this study is recommended.

Abedalmajeed Shajrawi, PhD, MSN, RN, is an assistant professor in the Faculty of Nursing at Applied Science Private University, Amman, Jordan. Dr. Shajrawi's research focuses on link between secondary prevention strategies and risk factors of patients with cardiovascular diseases. This includes research on secondary prevention strategies, patients with chronic diseases, measurement of physical activity and psychological factors.

Ahmed Mohammad Al-Smadi, PhD, MSN, RN, is an associate professor in the Faculty of Health Sciences at American University of Madaba, Jordan. His main research interest are cardiac care nursing, refugees’ health, and psychological health.

Ghadeer Khaled Al-Shawabkeh, MD, bachelor of medicine anaesthesia and ICU resident physician at Jordan University Hospital, Amman. Her main research interests are critical care patients and physical activity.

Hanadi Saleh Aljribeea, MSN, BSN, is a registered nurse in the Coronary Care Unit at Jordan University Hospital, Amman. Her main works focus on critical care patients, risk factors of coronary heart diseases and psychological factors.

Heba Khalil, PhD, RN, is an assistant professor in the Faculty of Nursing at Applied Science Private University, Amman, Jordan. Her main research interest is acute pain perception and response to opioid analgesia.

This work was not supported by any institutions.

The authors have disclosed that they have no significant relationship with, or financial interest in, any commercial companies pertaining to this article.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Abedalmajeed Shajrawi, PhD, MSN, RN, Faculty of Nursing, Applied Science Private University, Shafa Badran St, P.O. Box 166, Amman, 11931, Jordan (a_shajrawi@asu.edu.jo).

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