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Impact of Nursing Education on Phlebotomy Blood Loss and Hospital-Acquired Anemia

A Quality Improvement Project

Jones, Stacy, DNP, RN, AGACNP-BC; Spangler, Paris, DNP, RN, AGACNP-BC; Keiser, Megan, DNP, RN, CNRN, SCRN, CHSE, ACNS-BC, NP-C; Turkelson, Carman, DNP, MSN, RN, CCRN, CHSE

Dimensions of Critical Care Nursing: January/February 2019 - Volume 38 - Issue 1 - p 13–19
doi: 10.1097/DCC.0000000000000333
Educational DIMENSION

Background Phlebotomy blood loss resulting in hospital-acquired anemia remains a significant problem in the critically ill population. A quality improvement project focused on decreasing phlebotomy blood loss and increasing nursing knowledge regarding blood conservation strategies was undertaken in the intensive care unit of a community hospital.

Methods The project followed a quasi-experimental design. Data were gathered using electronic chart review and surveys before and after educational sessions. Intensive care unit nurses attended educational sessions focused on increasing knowledge regarding phlebotomy blood loss, hospital-acquired anemia, blood conservation strategies, and utilization of blood conservation devices.

Results The study showed a statistically significant increase in nursing knowledge regarding hospital-acquired anemia, phlebotomy blood loss, and blood conservation device use (P < .001) and a statistically significant change in blood conservation device application practice in the posteducation period when compared with the preeducation period (P = .016).

Conclusion The findings of this project support the added value of dedicated blood conservation education to nurses to promote increased knowledge, increased blood conservation device utilization, and decreases in phlebotomy blood loss.

Stacy Jones, DNP, RN, AGACNP-BC, recently completed her doctor of nursing practice degree at the University of Michigan-Flint School of Nursing.

Paris Spangler, DNP, RN, AGACNP-BC, recently completed her doctor of nursing practice degree at the University of Michigan-Flint School of Nursing.

Megan Keiser, DNP, RN, CNRN, SCRN, ACNS-BC, NP-C, is the director of Undergraduate Nursing Affairs and is an assistant professor at the University of Michigan-Flint School of Nursing.

Carman Turkelson, DNP, MSN, RN, CCRN, CHSE, is the associate director of the Simulation Center and is an assistant professor at the University of Michigan-Flint School of Nursing.

The authors have disclosed that they have no significant relationship with, or financial interest in, any commercial companies pertaining to this article.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Megan Keiser, DNP, RN, CNRN, SCRN, ACNS-BC, NP-C, University of Michigan-Flint, 303 E Kearsley St, 2180 William S White Building, Flint, MI 48502-1950 (keiserm@umflint.edu).

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