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Coronary heart disease and intestinal microbiota

Liu, Lina; He, Xuyub; Feng, Yingqingc

doi: 10.1097/MCA.0000000000000758
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Changes in human body systems influence metabolism and may cause disease. The intestinal microbiota influence health and is itself influenced by factors including diet and drugs. Investigation of the relationship of the intestinal microbiota and chronic conditions like coronary heart disease (CHD) has been facilitated by advances in sequencing technology. Some studies have identified changes in the composition and the metabolism of intestinal microbiota in patients with CHD, including increases in phyla Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria and decreases in phyla Firmicutes and Fusobacteria. The ratio of two metabolites of intestinal bacteria, trimethylamine and trimethylamine N-oxide, has been found to be related to CHD. This review summarizes recent research to provide ideas for further research on the relationships between intestinal microbiota and CHD and on the preventive measures for CHD.

aThe Second School of Clinical Medicine, Southern Medical University

bDepartment of Cardiology, Guangdong Provincial People’s Hospital

cGuangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coronary Heart Disease Prevention, Hypertension Research Laboratory, Department of Cardiology, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Provincial People’s Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, The Second School of Clinical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China

Correspondence to Yingqing Feng, PhD, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Coronary Heart Disease Prevention, Department of Cardiology, Guangdong Cardiovascular Institute, Guangdong Provincial People’s Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, The Second School of Clinical Medicine, Southern Medical University, 106 Zhongshan Road 2, Guangzhou 510080, China Tel/fax: +86 208 382 7812; e-mail: 651792209@qq.com

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