Issue Overview

Behavioral Neurology p. August 2010, Vol.16, No.4 doi: 10.1212/01.CON.0000428406.22301.4e
Issue Overview
BROWSE ARTICLES

Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology® is designed to help practicing neurologists stay abreast of advances in the field while simultaneously developing lifelong self-directed learning skills.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of the Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology Behavioral Neurology issue, participants will be able to:

  • Understand the neurologic basis for disorders of attention
  • Recognize visuospatial and visual-perceptual deficits
  • Understand mechanisms associated with disorders of language comprehension and expression
  • Appreciate disorders of social comportment and personality that are caused by neurologic disease
  • Recognize limitations of executive control that result from neurologic disease and understand the impact of these disorders on performance in multiple cognitive domains
  • Identify the ethical principles raised by a request from an adult patient for neuroenhancement therapy
  • Discuss the challenges and opportunities that exist for optimizing cognitive function in the cognitively fragile patient
  • Reinforce their understanding of the clinical evaluation of patients with cognitive concerns and the use of appropriate diagnostic tools

Core Competencies

The Continuum Behavioral Neurology issue covers the following core competencies:

  • ▸ Patient Care
  • ▸ Medical Knowledge
  • ▸ Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
  • ▸ Interpersonal and Communication Skills
  • ▸ Professionalism
  • ▸ Systems-Based Practice

Disclosures

CONTRIBUTORS

MURRAY GROSSMAN, MD, FAAN, Guest Editor

Professor of Neurology and Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

*Dr Grossman has received personal compensation for consulting from Allon Therapeutics Inc., Forest Laboratories, Inc., and Pfizer Inc, and for serving as editor of Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology. Dr Grossman´s compensation and/or research work has been funded entirely or in part by a grant to his university from a governmental organization.

†Dr Grossman has nothing to disclose.

JASON J. S. BARTON, MD, PhD, FRCPC

Professor and Canada Research Chair, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

*†Dr Barton has nothing to disclose.

ANDREW E. BUDSON, MD

Deputy Chief of Staff and Neurologist, Geriatric Research Education Clinical Center, Boston VA Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts; Associate Director for Research, Boston University Alzheimer´s Disease Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Professor of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts

*Dr Budson has received personal compensation for speaking engagements from Eisai Inc., Forest Laboratories, Inc., Johnson & Johnson Services, Inc., and Pfizer Inc. Dr Budson´s compensation and/or research work has been funded entirely or in part by a grant from a governmental organization to his university.

*†Dr Budson has nothing to disclose.

ANJAN CHATTERJEE, MD, FAAN

Professor of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

*Dr Chatterjee has received personal compensation for editorial work from Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience.

Dr Chatterjee discusses the experimental use of dopamine agonists for neglect.

H. BRANCH COSLETT, MD, FAAN

Professor of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

*†Dr Coslett has nothing to disclose.

THOMAS J. GRABOWSKI, MD, FAAN

Professor of Radiology and Neurology; Director, Integrated Brain Imaging Center; University of Washington, Seattle, Washington

*†Dr Grabowski has nothing to disclose.

RACHEL G. GROSS, MD

Fellow, Cognitive Neurology and Movement Disorders, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

*†Dr Gross has nothing to disclose.

KENNETH M. HEILMAN, MD, FAAN

The James E. Rooks Jr. Distinguished Professor of Neurology, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida

*Dr Heilman has received personal compensation for review activities from Journal Watch. Dr Heilman´s compensation and/or research work has been funded entirely or in part by grants to his university from a governmental organization, a nonprofit tax-exempt organization, Myriad Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Esai Pharmaceuticals, and the Alzheimer´s Association.

Dr Heilman has nothing to disclose.

ARGYE E. HILLIS, MD

Professor, Deputy Director of Neurology, Director, Neurology Residency Program, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland

*Dr Hillis has received personal compensation for serving as the editor of Behavioural Neurology. Dr Hillis´ personal compensation/and or research work has been funded entirely or in part by governmental organization grants to her university.

Dr Hillis has nothing to disclose.

WILLIAM T. HU, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor, Department of Neurology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia

*Dr Hu has received research support from the Penn-Pfizer Alliance.

†Dr Hu discusses the unlabeled use of medications for frontotemporal degeneration, including cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine.

ELIZABETH H. LACEY, PhD

Interdisciplinary Program in Neuroscience, Georgetown University, Washington, DC; Cognitive Neuropsychology Laboratory, Department of Neurology, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC

*†Dr Lacey has nothing to disclose.

DANIEL LARRIVIERE, MD, JD

Assistant Professor, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Charlottesville, Virginia; Academic Instructor, University of Virginia School of Law, Charlottesville, Virginia

*Dr Larriviere has received personal compensation for speaking engagements from the American Association for the Advancement of Science and has received research support in the form of an unrestricted educational grant from Allergan, Inc.

*†Dr Larriviere has nothing to disclose.

M.-MARSEL MESULAM, MD, FAAN

Professor of Neurology, Psychiatry, and Psychology; Director, Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer´s Disease Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

*†Dr Mesulam has nothing to disclose.

BRUCE L. MILLER, MD

A.W. and Mary Margaret Clausen Distinguished Professor, Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California

*Dr Miller has received personal compensation for editorial activities from Neurocase.

Dr Miller has nothing to disclose.

STEPHEN E. NADEAU, MD

Chief, Neurology Service, Malcom Randall VA Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida; Professor of Neurology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida

*Dr Nadeau has received personal compensation for speaking engagements from the Halifax Medical Society and the University of Florida College of Medicine, Department of Medicine. Dr Nadeau has received personal compensation as an associate editor of the Journal of the International Neuropsychology Society. Dr Nadeau´s compensation and/or research work has been funded entirely or in part by a grant to his university from a governmental organization.

Dr Nadeau discusses the unlabeled use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors to treat psychotic manifestations, apathy, indifference, and anxiety in patients with dementia.

KATHERINE P. RANKIN, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California

*†Dr Rankin has nothing to disclose.

DAVID P. ROELTGEN, MD, FAAN

Professor of Neurology, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC

*†Dr Roeltgen has nothing to disclose.

HYUNGSUB SHIM, MD

Resident, Department of Neurology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa

*†Dr Shim has nothing to disclose.

MARC SOLLBERGER, MD

Senior Physician, Memory Clinic, Department of Geriatrics; Department of Neurology, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland

*†Dr Sollberger has nothing to disclose.

DAVID A. WOLK, MD

Assistant Professor, Department of Neurology, Assistant Director, Penn Memory Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

*Dr Wolk has received personal compensation for consulting activities with GE Healthcare, Inc., and Avacat Consulting, LLC.

Dr Wolk has nothing to disclose.

MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTION WRITERS

EDUARDO E. BENARROCH, MD, DSci, FAAN

Professor of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

*Dr Benarroch has received personal compensation in an editorial capacity from Neurology.

Dr Benarroch has nothing to disclose.

D. JOANNE LYNN, MD, FAAN

Associate Professor, Department of Neurology, Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio; Associate Dean for Student Life, Ohio State University College of Medicine, Columbus, Ohio

*Dr Lynn holds $10,000 worth of stock in Abbott Laboratories, Inc., Bristol-Myers Squibb Company, Hospira, Inc., and Johnson & Johnson Services, Inc. Dr Lynn is the principal or co-investigator for clinical trials supported by Accelerated Cure Project for Multiple Sclerosis, Acorda Therapeutics, Inc., Allergan, Inc., Biogen Idec, BioMS Medical Corporation, EMD Serono, Inc., Genentech, Inc., Genzyme Corporation, Immune Tolerance Network, National Institutes of Health, National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Inc., TEVA Neuroscience, UCB, and University of California, San Francisco.

Dr Lynn has nothing to disclose.

*Relationship Disclosure

†Unlabeled Use of Products/Investigational Use Disclosure

Methods of Participation and Instructions for Use

Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology® is designed to help practicing neurologists stay abreast of advances in the field while simultaneously developing lifelong self-directed learning skills. In Continuum, the process of absorbing, integrating, and applying the material presented is as important as, if not more important than, the material itself.

The goals of Continuum include disseminating up-to-date information to the practicing neurologist in a lively, interactive format; fostering self-assessment and lifelong study skills; encouraging critical thinking; and, in the final analysis, strengthening and improving patient care.

Each Continuum issue is prepared by distinguished faculty who are acknowledged leaders in their respective fields. Six issues are published annually and are composed of the syllabus text, a set of multiple-choice items with preferred responses, case-based sections pertaining to ethical and practice issues related to the issue, and a patient management problem.

The syllabus text emphasizes clinical issues emerging in the field in recent years. Case reports and vignettes are used liberally, as are tables and illustrations. A CD of patient case vignettes relating to the issue topic accompanies one issue each year.

The practice of neurology presents a series of ethical challenges for the clinician. These rarely have simple or straightforward solutions, but require careful consideration by the neurologist. The Ethical Perspectives section provides a case vignette that raises one or more ethical questions related to the Continuum topic. Discussion follows the case to help the reader understand and resolve the ethical dilemma.

In addition to the lifelong learning of new clinical and scientific knowledge, neurologists must understand the constantly evolving environment in which they practice. Changes occur rapidly in reimbursement and regulatory areas, in the integration of evidence-based medicine, and in the implementation of patient safety measures into clinical practice. The Practice section presents a case-based example of these issues as they relate to the clinical topic as well as a coding table relevant to the issue topic.

The text can be reviewed and digested most effectively by establishing a regular schedule of study in the office or at home, either alone or in an interactive group. If program subscribers use such regular and perhaps new study habits, Continuum’s goal of establishing lifelong learning patterns can be met.

Multiple-Choice questions accompany each syllabus text. They are not intended as an examination but rather as a means of stimulating thought and helping you assess your general understanding of the course material. Subscribers may complete the questions online. Your responses will be kept completely confidential. Then, review the preferred response and critique for each multiple-choice item. Upon submission of the evaluation at the end of the Multiple-Choice Questions, you may earn up to 10 hours of American Medical Association (AMA) Physician’s Recognition Award (PRA) Category 1 Credit™.

Beginning in 2011, each Continuum issue also includes an interactive Patient Management Problem for which participants may earn an additional 2 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. The patient management problem should help sharpen critical thinking skills used daily in the clinical practice of neurology.

The opinions of subscribers play a vital role in the future development of the program. Let us know what you think of each issue, using the comment section provided on the answer form. A transcript of credits earned will be available to you on the AAN website within two business days. (Note: Participants have up to 3 years from the date of publication to earn CME credits for each issue, unless otherwise notified by the AAN.)

© 2010 American Academy of Neurology